War of the Rebellion: Serial 029 Page 0539 Chapter XXXII. THE STONE'S RIVER CAMPAIGN.

Search Civil War Official Records

slowly back. After returning through the woods about 200 yards, I took command of my regiment, which was then reformed and faced to the front, and again advanced; but, having little support, and seeing the enemy advancing in strong bodies, I determined to withdraw and seeing the enemy advancing in strong bodies, I determined to withdraw and rejoin the brigade.

Just here I was informed that three pieces of artillery, belonging to Negley's division, had been abandoned in the woods some 400 yards to my right, and were about falling into the hands of the enemy. I immediately moved my regiment by the flank double-quick to the spot, and, having cut the traces, I brought them off in safety; and, placing them out of danger, I rejoined the brigade, which was formed on the railroad in rear of former position.

The brigade remained near this place until 4 a.m. next morning, when we were advanced farther to the front, where we remained but a short time, when we returned to our former position.

After daylight my regiment moved with the brigade to a position farther to the left, where we remained until the afternoon, when we were moved still farther to the left, near Stone's River, to the support of Swallow's battery. Here we built small breastworks in our front and around the guns of the battery, and remained in an exposed condition, amid the rain, until the evening of January 3.

During the severe battle of that day on the left, my regiment was exposed to a terrible fire from the enemy's batteries, which had engaged those of Swallow and Parsons, which the brigade was supporting. Here I had 1 man mortally wounded by the explosion of a shell.

From that time to date we have participated with the brigade in all its movements. From the time our forces left Nashville up to this date my regiment has been in the advance, never in reserve; and on all occasions, and under all circumstances, both men and officers have performed nobly and heroically the task allotted them.

In the action on the 31st, and during the fight on January 2, soldiers never displayed more undaunted courage than those of the Second Kentucky. Those that live are heroes, every one; those that died are martyrs to their country's cause.

Lieutenant Colonel Warner Spencer, Major J. R. Hurd, and Captain A. J. M. Browne deserve special mention and commendation for their gallantry and daring. In fact, every officer of the regiment is deserving of the greatest praise. Colonel Osborn, Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, and Captain Hallowell, of the Thirty-first Indiana Volunteers, merit great praise for the manner in which they discharged their various duties during the action of the 31st*.

RECAPITULATION OF CASUALTIES.

Killed ..................................................... 8

Mortally wounded ........................................... 2

Seriously wounded .......................................... 30

Slightly wounded ........................................... 27

Missing .................................................... 10

----

Total ...................................................... 77

Nine wounded were taken prisoners.

I have the honor to be, with much respect, your obedient servant,

T. D. SEDGEWICK,

Colonel Second Kentucky Volunteers.

Captain W. H. FAIRBANKS,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

---------------

*Nominal list omitted.

---------------