War of the Rebellion: Serial 029 Page 0474 KY.,MID. AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXII.

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battery, in firing upon Bradley's battery on January 2, was such as, in my judgment, demands immediate investigation, in order that the parties guilty of such gross carelessness may be properly punished.

I am, sir, most respectfully,

MILO S. HASCALL,

Brigadier-General of Vols., Comdg. First Division, Left Wing.

Major STARLING,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Left Wing.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, LEFT WING,

Murfreesborough, Tenn., January 17, 1863.

In the hurry of making out my official report as division commander, I neglected to allude to the very valuable services rendered by Surg. W. W. Blair, medical director of this division, during and since the recent battles. His services were such as merit special commendation, and I desire that this may be forwarded as a part of my report, in justice to Dr. Blair. He reports to me that all the regimental surgeons were efficient and rendered valuable service.

I am, sir, respectfully,

MILO S. HASCALL,

Brigadier-General of Vols., Comdg. First Division, Left Wing.

Major STARLING,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Left Wing.

No. 98. Report of Major Seymour Race, First Ohio Light Artillery, Chief of Artillery.

HDQRS. ARTILLERY FIRST DIVISION, LEFT WING, January 7, 1863.

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to submit to you the official reports of the commanding officers of the batteries of this division.

About 9 a.m. of December 31, 1862, Captain Cullen Bradley, Sixth Ohio Light Battery, by orders, moved his battery, with Harker's brigade, to the extreme right of our lines, where they engaged the enemy's artillery (two four-gun batteries, supposed) and infantry in a most severely contested battle. Before superior numbers of the enemy, the brigade and battery (after repulsing the first attack of the enemy) were obliged to retire, but not without disputing every inch of ground, Captain Bradley being obliged to leave two of his guns on the field. They were soon after taken by the Thirteenth Michigan, Colonel Shoemaker, whose timely support forced the enemy to retire.

Captain Bradley's battery was under my immediate observation, and the conduct of Captain Bradley, his subordinate officers, and men was such as to entitle them to great credit. The conduct of this battery on January 2, under the fire of three batteries of the enemy, was gallant in the extreme. The enemy's batteries were nearly silenced, when Captain Stoke's battery opened, 300 yards in rear of Bradley, with canister, at a distance of at least 2,200 yards from the enemy's guns. Captain Bradley had 5 men and 5 horses wounded by their fire, and was obliged to retire.

I respectfully ask an investigation into the conduct of Stoke's battery on this occasion. Captain J. B. Cox, Tenth Indiana Battery, and Lieutenant.