War of the Rebellion: Serial 029 Page 0309 Chapter XXXII. THE STONE'S RIVER CAMPAIGN.

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were vigilant and prompt in every duty, and to them I am under special obligations for suggestions on the field. Though not acting under my personal observation on the 31st, they were in the thickest of the fight and officers of experience speak of their conduct as being most intelligent and heroic in rallying our forces. James Purdy, mounted orderly, merits especial praise for his activity and courage throughout the week of battles.

I must express the deep regret of officers and men at the capture of Brigadier-General Willich; having the confidence of the brigade, and being a soldier of education and experience, his removal from the command at this juncture is a public misfortune.

To Brigadier-General Johnson we are under obligations for constant vigilance, unremitting energy, and his many acts of kindness and expressions of confidence toward this command.

In the name of the brigade, I am allowed to thank Major-General McCook and the general-in-chief for their flattering attentions on the field, and for their repeated exhibitions of confidence in our efficiency, prudence, and courage.

I am, most respectfully,

W. H. GIBSON,

Colonel, Commanding First Brigade.

Capt. J. R. BARTLETT,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

No. 35. Report of Lieut. Col. Charles T. Hotchkiss, Eighty-ninth Illinois Infantry.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTY-NINTH ILLINOIS INFANTRY, FIRST BRIGADE, SECOND DIVISION, RIGHT WING, In Camp near Murfreesborough, Tenn., January 7, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by this regiments in the series of engagements between the Federal and rebel forces near Murfreesborough, Tenn., and upon the approaches thereto, commencing on December 26, 1862, and ending on January 4, 1863, when the latter, under General Bragg, were defeated by the army of General Rosecrans and forced to evacuate all their positions in and about Murfreesborough.

This regiment left camp, in front of Nashville, with my brigade on the morning of December 26, taking the Nolensville pike and moving slowly with the column [as the enemy had to be driven by the advance] through Nolensville, Triune, and along the Murfreesborough and Franklin road, arriving, on the night of the 30th, at a point about 3 1/2 miles due west from Murfreesborough, where, just after dark, the brigade was put in position on the extreme right of our right wing, about 200 yards in rear of and at right angles with Kirk's brigade.

My regiment was formed in double column at half distance in rear of the Forty-ninth Ohio, which was formed in line, fronting south. The Fifteenth Ohio formed in line, fronting west, on my right flank, with Battery A, First Ohio Artillery, near the right flank of the Forty-ninth Ohio and the left flank of the Fifteenth Ohio, the Thirty-second and Thirty-ninth Indiana Regiments being on picket covering the front of