War of the Rebellion: Serial 029 Page 0276 KY.,MID. AND E.TENN.,N.ALA., AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXII.

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the fighting of the day, except that two companies of my regiment were sent out just as skirmishers, under command of First Lieutenant Blakesley, who rendered important service in a brilliant skirmish with a large cavalry force.

The day following my regiment was put in line of battle at an early hour, and stood at their arms till near right, momentarily exception to make or receive an attack.

On Friday, just at night, my command was put in rapid march across Stone's River, to the extreme left, where a fierce battle was raging, but was closed just before our arrival, by the retreat of the enemy. Late in the evening we bivouacked here, without fires, in such close proximity to the enemy's line as to produce frequent skirmishing between the pickets during the night, which was intensely dark and stormy. Remaining here through the following day and night, suffering the severities of an almost uninterrupted storm, without fires or shelter, until 4 o'clock Sunday, morning, I returned with my command to the camp previously occupied.

The hardships, privations, and exposures in the march from Louisville to Crab Orchard, and thence to Nashville, have been regarded nearly unendurable by new troops, and yet wile they sink into utter insignificance compared with those of our march and engagement during these eighth days, I have the gratifications of knowing that my regiment have met and endured them with the utmost promptness, fortitude, and cheerfulness, facing enemy in the heat of battle with the coolness, courage, and determination of experienced soldiers and true patriots, ready at every call to face few danger without faltering, undergoing the most extraordinary labor and exposure without murmuring, and evincing under all circumstances a spirit of subordination and discipline worthy of the highest commendation.

I have also the pleasure to say that during all these trying hardships the general health of the men been better that at any time since we left Louisville. While I have such occasion to commend the fidelity, bravery, and good conduct of all the officer my command, save one, I should fail to do justice were I to omit to make special note of the cool, persistent courage of Capt. J. H. Douglass, in remaining at his post under the fire of the enemy, and of his promptness and efficiency in forming and maintaining the lines during the day. It is not to be presumed that all the meritorious acts of privates will come within the personal observation of the commander of a regiment, but having been eyewitness of the fearless bravery and enthusiastic zeal of Private Charles A. Allen, of Company E, during the operations of Wednesday, as well as at other times, I commend him as worthy of promotion.

I desire also to acknowledge my obligations to Major Dutcher and Adjutant Nieman, for their constant and able assistance during this eventful period.

The casualties in my command, as more fully stated in the report herewith forward, are:

Killed.................................................... 8

Wounded................................................... 35

Missing................................................... 42

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Total..................................................... 85

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JASON MARSH,

Colonel Seventy-fourth Illinois Volunteers.

Col. P. SIDNEY POST,

Commanding First Brigade.