War of the Rebellion: Serial 029 Page 0265 Chapter XXXII. THE STONE'S RIVER CAMPAIGN.

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some time hotly engaged with the enemy across the river, on our extreme left.

Moving as rapidly as possible across the river to the field of battle, I found our gallant troops forcing the enemy back on hi reserves. The brigade of Colonel Woodruff, being in the advance, only arrived in time to participate in the general engagement.

After relieving the troops of General Palmer and Colonel Beatty, and particularly the brigade of Colonel Hazen, which had so nobly vindicated their courage in the then closing conflict, I ordered a heavy line of skirmishers to be thrown out. The enemy's lines were soon encountered, and a renewal of the engagement seemed imminent. A few rounds of grape and canister from one of our batteries, however, caused them to withdraw, and night again brought a cessation of hostilities.

During the night I disposed of my troops in such manner as would best enable me to repel an attack, and, in compliance with instructions, I directed rifle-pits and breastworks to be thrown up. This was done, and morning found us well prepared for any emergency, either offensive or defensive.

The following day (January 3) considerable skirmishing was kept up, without abatement, from early in the morning until dark.

During the night I received orders from General Crittenden to withdraw my command from the east bank of the river, and to report with it to General McCook. This movements was executed between the hours of 1 and 4 o'clock in the morning, during which time the rain fell incessantly.

The pickets about this time reported the enemy as having been very active in their movements during the latter part of the night, and their convictions that he was evacuating his position. Further observations, made after daylight, found this to be the case.

The following list of casualties shows a loss in the division during the several engagements above described as follows:

Commissioned officers:

Killed................................................. 16

Wounded................................................ 34

Missing................................................ 2

Enlisted men:

Killed.................................................. 176

Wounded................................................. 784

Missing................................................. 399

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Total killed, wounded, and missing.....................*1,411

The divisions lost three pieces of artillery and captured two. In the list of officers killed are the names of Colonel Stem, One hundred and first Ohio; Colonel Williams, Twenty-fifth Illinois; Lieutenant-Colonel Wooster, One hundred and first Ohio;

Lieutenant-Colonel McKee, Fifteenth Wisconsin; Captain Carpenter, Eighth Wisconsin Battery, and Captain McCulloch, Second Kentucky Cavalry, of my staff, whose noble deeds of valor on the field had already placed their names on the list of brave men. The history of the war will record no brighter names, and the country will mourn the loss of no more devoted patriots, than these.

Among the wounded are Colonel Alexander, Twenty-first Illinois; Lieutenant-Colonel Tanner, Twenty-second Indiana; Captain Pinney, Fifth Wisconsin Battery, and Captain Austin, acting assistant adjutant-general, on the staff of Colonel Woodruff, whose names it affords me special gratification to mention.