War of the Rebellion: Serial 029 Page 0186 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA.

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[CHAP. XXXII.

traveling and subsistence will permit. Will you please ask the President to have Captain Morton, engineer, made Brigadier-general? He has distinguished himself in the fortification and defense of Nashville, after our army left for Kentucky. He has organized a Pioneer Corps of 1,700 picked men, which he now commands, with the rank of captain, and behaved like a hero during the whole battle of Stone's River. He not only deserve the promotion, but it is absolutely necessary to the interest of the service that he should have the rank to command his brigade.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Via Nashville, Tenn., January 5, 1863.

We have fought one of the greatest battles of the war, and are victorious. Our entire success on the 31st was prevented by a surprise of the right flank; but have, nevertheless, beaten the enemy, after a three-days' battle. They fled with great precipitancy on Saturday night. The last of their columns of cavalry left his morning. Their loss has been very heavy. Generals Rains and Hanson killed. Chalmers, Adams, and Breckinridge are wounded.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

EXECUTIVE MANSION,

Washington, January 5, 1863.

Major-General W. S. ROSECRANS,

Murfreesborough, Tenn.:

Your dispatch announcing retreat of enemy has just reached here. God bless you, and all with you! Please tender to all, and accept for yourself, the nation's gratitude for your and their skill, endurance, and dauntless courage.

A. LINCOLN.

MURFREESBOROUGH,

January 8, 1863.

Did not have up trains before close of battle. Bringing up subsistence rapidly. Will have railroad completed here in a few days. Rebels had eight divisions of infantry. Seven have gone by Manchester and one by Shelbyville. Their prisoners and doctors estimate their loss at from 13,000 to 15,000. The weight of testimony warrants these figures. Glad to hear of batteries coming. to secure our long lines of communication requires a large force. To fight and maneuver in these regions of roads, ravines, cedar thickets and mountains, against a determined defensive policy, with certainty of success, demand the same. The Cumberland River is now navigable.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

Major-General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.