War of the Rebellion: Serial 029 Page 0136 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA.

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[CHAP. XXXII.

I am satisfied that, if I abandon this point, the bridge will be destroyed as soon as it is known that there are but two companies here; and hence I do not feel that I ought to go beyond here without orders, under the circumstances by which I am surrounded. I consider myself subject to your orders. All my camp equipage is at Gallatin. Tell me what I must do. If Morgan goes into Central Kentucky, I cannot possibly overtake him by my almost thoroughly exhausted infantry, but it may be that some arrangement could be made to render my brigade serviceable in driving Morgan, and saving particular localities of importance. It is for you to determine what is to be done. I could have saved the road but for defective engines furnished at Nashville and Bowling Green to convey my troops. The engine seemed to get out of order just at the wrong time; that delayed me thirty-six hours. The rear train, conveying the Fourth Kentucky and part of battery, did not arrive at Munfordville until 10 o'clock on Sunday night. The trestle-work was destroyed Monday after dinner. I left Munfordville 3 o'clock Monday morning. The road between Munfordville and Bowling Green ii all right; nd between Munfordville and Elizabethtown the damage is not very great, consisting mainly in the destruction of the bridges, which can be easily repaired. The telegraph is injured a good deal.

Whether I am to halt here or go on, I need 1,000 pairs of shoes and 2,000 pairs of socks. My men will suffer unless supplied. If it is clear that I have complied with my orders, then I suppose that I should return to Gallatin, unless the higher authorities in Kentucky think that my remaining here is necessary to aid in keeping the army supplied my remaining here is necessary to aid in keeping the army supplied with provisions. Let me hear from you fully, and I will endeavor to communicate with you to-day by telegraph (pocket instrument). May not Morgan also make a dash on the bridge at Frankfort? He could reach that point from Bardstown, but I fear that his main object of attack is the bridge at Shepherdsville. That is the opinion at department headquarters, as I learn. I have now out numerous scouts to ascertain, if possible, whether Morgan is crossing from Boston and Bardstown to Shepherdsville. If I find that he is on his way to Shepherdsville, I will attack him on the way or endeavor to get in his rear.

Yours, truly,

JOHN M. HARLAN,

Colonel, Commanding Second Brigade.

Brigadier General J. T. BOYLE.

LEBANON JUNCTION, January 1, 1863.

GENERAL: A dispatch from Lieutenant-Colonel Holeman, commanding at Lebanon, says Morgan's force encamped at Muldraugh's Hill, 8 miles from here, on Columbia road, last night. Colonels Hoskins and Reid are pursuing with their commands. When last heard from Colonel Hoskins was close upon his rear, near Campbellsville, at 12 o'clock to-day. Colonel Halisy, Sixth Kentucky Cavalry, was murdered last night by Morgan's men; his body is here. Was shot, after he had surrendered by a rebel officer. We have captured about 90 of Morgan's men to-day, considerable quantity of arms, ammunition, &c. I will send messenger to Hobson and Reynolds.

JOHN M. HARLAN,

Colonel, Commanding Second Brigade.

Brigadier General J. T. BOYLE.