War of the Rebellion: Serial 029 Page 0065 Chapter XXXII. ACTION AT HARTSVILLE, TENN.

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No. 14. Return of casualties in the Confederate forces

at Hartsville, Tenn., December 7, 1862.

[Compiles from nominal lists.]

Killed. Wounded.

Command. Officer Enliste Officer Enlist

s. d men. s. ed men

Morgan's brigade:

Staff --- --- 1 1

Gano's regiment --- --- --- ---

Cluke's regiment 1 1 4 20

Chenault's regiment --- 1 --- 4

Bennett's regiment --- 1 1 2

Total 1 3 6 27

Hanson's brigade:

2nd Kentucky 2 6 3 51

9th Kentucky 1 5 1 9

Cobb's battery --- 3 --- 7

Total 3 14 4 67

Grand total 4 17 10 94

Missing.

Command. Offi Enlis Aggreg Remarks.

cers ted ate.

men.

Morgan's brigade:

Staff --- --- 2

Gano's regiment --- 1 1

Cluke's regiment 1 5 32 Lieutenant W. S.

Kendall killed.

Chenault's regiment --- --- 5

Bennett's regiment --- --- 4

Total 1 6 44

Hanson's brigade:

2nd Kentucky --- 6 68 Lieutenants John W.

Rogers and Charles

H. Thomas killed,

and Lieutenant

Thomas M. Horne

mortally wounded.

9th Kentucky --- 1 17 Lieutenant

Dandridge S.

Crockett killed.

Cobb's battery --- --- 10

Total --- 7 95

Grand total 1 13 139

No. 15. Report of Brig. General John H. Morgan, C. S. Army, commanding expedition.

MORGAN'S HEADQUARTERS,

Cross-Roads, near Murfreesborough, Tenn., December 9, 1862.

SIR: I have the honor to lay before you, for the information of the general commanding, a report of the expedition against the Federal force at Hartsville:

I left these headquarters at 10 a.m. on the 6th instant, with 1,400 men of my own command, under the orders of Colonel Duke; the Second and Ninth Kentucky Infantry, commanded by Colonel [T. H.] Hunt; Captain [Robert] Cobb's battery of artillery, two small howitzers, and two rifled Ellsworth guns belonging to my own command. At Lebanon I received information that no change had been made in the number of the Federals at Hartsville, their number being still about 900 infantry and 400 cavalry, with two pieces of artillery. I found afterward that their force had been considerably underrated. I proceeded with the infantry and artillery to Purier's Ferry, on the Cumberland River, sending the cavalry, under the orders of Colonel Duke, to pass at a ford some 7 miles below the point where we were to rendezvous. I passed my troops with great difficulty, there being but one boat, and about 5.30 on the morning of the 7th I arrived at Hager's Shop, 2 miles from the Federal camp. I found that Colonel Duke, with his cavalry, had only just marched up, having crossed the ford with difficulty, and that one

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