War of the Rebellion: Serial 029 Page 0044 KY.,MID. AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXII.

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affair at Harstville, but escaped capture, shows that there were no cavalry vedettes out in that direction, no picket guard, and apparently no camp guard; that the first notice in camp of the presence of the enemy was given by an orderly, or servant, that the enemy's cavalry was coming up and wheeling, by fours, into line on the opposite side of a ravine, about 400 yards distant from our camp; that they were quietly formed without a shot being fired at them; that the artillery did nothing to disturb them; that only two companies of skirmishers turned out; that the infantry stood in line of battle at "ordered arms," and allowed the enemy to dismount and advance, as skirmishers, within 100 yards before they commenced firing. the artillery allowed the enemy's mountain howitzers, and probably two other pieces, to move up into position without disturbing them. It was finally brought out of the woods, and fired a few shots, with little effect, as the enemy advanced in line of skirmishers. Closing in, our troops soon fell into confusion, ran to their camp in a crowd, where the enemy's artillery played on them, and they soon hoisted a white flag and surrendered. The behavior of the Second Indiana Cavalry seems to have been as spiritless as their picketing. The enemy hastily exchanged their Austrian for our Springfield rifles, leaving many arms on the field; drove their prisoners across the river, waist-deep, and retreated so hastily that, when our succor arrived, a light battalion of cavalry pursued them across the river and retook three wagon-loads of our arms. Probably 30 wagons lost. These facts indicate pretty clearly where the blame lies. It is pretty certain that the enemy's force did not exceed 2,500 men-two regiments of mounted, and, possibly, two dismounted cavalry. No official reports yet in.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. 14TH ARMY CORPS, DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Nashville, Tenn., December 22, 1862.

Brig. General LORENZO THOMAS,

Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor herewith to transmit all the official reports that have been received at these headquarters of the battle at Hartsville, Tenn., on the 7th instant.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding Department.

[Indorsements.]

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, January 13, 1863.

Respectfully returned to Major-General Rosecrans, to ascertain and report who are the guilty officers concerned in the surrender of Hartsville, Tenn.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

The within reports and statements show that the United States forces captured at the above place December 7, 1862, were either surprised or that great negligence was displayed in failing to prepare for the