War of the Rebellion: Serial 029 Page 0034 KY.,MID. E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXII.

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The officers in battle and on the march have conducted themselves in a praiseworthy manner.

By order of Colonel John N. Clarkson, commanding First Brigade, Virginia State Line.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. WOODS,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

Major-General J. B. FLOYD.

DECEMBER 6, 1862.-Skirmish near Kimbrough's Mill, Mill Creek, Tenn.

LIST OF REPORTS.

No. 1.-Brig. General Joshua W. Sill, U. S. Army.

No. 2.-Colonel Harvey M. Buckley, Fifth Kentucky Infantry, commanding brigade.

No. 3.-Colonel Charles Anderson, Ninety-third Ohio Infantry.

No. 4.-Lieut. Colonel Milton Barnes, Ninety-seventh Ohio Infantry.

No. 5.-Captain T. R. Palmer, inspector First Division, Twenty-first Army Corps.

No. 1. Report of Brig. General Joshua W. Sill, U. S. Army.

CAMP MILL CREEK, December 6, 1862-7 p.m.

GENERAL: Our forage train was attacked by cavalry and artillery to-day. I presume it was Wheeler's command. We had 1 man killed and 2 wounded. The enemy captured 8 of the wagons of Hascall's division, which were out on the same road. Will send you written report to-morrow morning.

J. W. SILL,

Brigadier-General.

General McCOOK.

No. 2. Report of Colonel Harvey M. Buckley, Fifth Kentucky Infantry, commanding brigade.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH BRIGADE, December 7, 1862.

CAPTAIN: The following is a brief statement of the skirmish on yesterday, between the enemy and the guard of forage train:

I left camp in command of the First Ohio, Ninety-third Ohio, and Fifth Kentucky, and two sections of Battery H. Arrived at the point indicted by forage-master to fill the train about noon of yesterday, which place is about 7 miles from this camp. We discovered the enemy about one-half mile in front of us, numbering about 15 or 20 mounted men. Lieutenant Ludlow, of battery, brought his gun to bear upon them, and fired two shots, after which they disappeared. I then ordered the First Ohio to the front and right to protect the wagons, which were