War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0707 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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mont, General McClellan's headquarters being at Rectortown. This may be for obtaining supplies by the railroad, or it may be with the view of making a descent upon Front Royal or Strasburg, to intercept General Jackson in his egress from the valley. Can you ascertain what he is doing in your front; if he is stationary, or what he is about? If he moves into the valley, I will advance Longstreet's corps to cut off his communication with the railroad. You will se the necessity, therefore, of watching him closely. You will be placed to learn that, upon the abandonment of Snicker's Gap, General A. P. Hill pushed his picketers to Snickersville, and that Major White, with his battalion of cavalry, took 104 prisoners and captured some wagons and ambulances.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE,

General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

November 10, 1862.

Honorable GEORGE W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: Finding that the enemy had apparently halted in his advance, I directed General Stuart to move with his cavalry, penetrate the line of pickets, and endeavor to ascertain his disposition. Accordingly, this morning, with Lee's brigade and two regiments of infantry, he drove them back to Amissville, causing them to withdraw from Washington, and to recall a party that was apparently proceeding down the river below Rappahannock Station. Upon reaching Amissville, the enemy advanced against him three brigades of infantry, which caused him to retire. This was done in good order, and his loss during the day was 4 wounded. A few of the enemy were killed and more wounded. He ascertained that none of their infantry was established this side of the Rappahannock, but saw large encampments beyond Warrenton, which were said to be Sigel's.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

November 10, 1862.

Honorable GEORGE W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War, Richmond, Va:

SIR: On the 20th ultimo I had the honor to write you with reference to Mr. Kirby, an Englishman or Canadian, to whom I gave a passport to Richmond. As you will perceive, I had no personal knowledge of this person, and permitted him to go to avoid sending him back through the lines of this army, and to enable him to find persons to whom he referred in that city who would vouch for him. Since that time a letter ferred received from Baltimore by one of my staff, which I think proper to bring to your attention, lest injury should result from the presence of Mr. Kirby within our lines. I respectfully refer you to the inclosed letter and to the indorsement of Major Marshall thereon, form which you will be able to determine the proper course to pursue with reference to Mr. Kirby. Unless you shall be satisfied that no injury will result from permitting him to remain within our borders, I recommend that he be sent to the United States by a flag of truce boat or by way of Fredericksburg,