War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0619 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

are properly filled. A brigade guard will march in rear of each brigade to keep up the ranks, drive up all stragglers, irrespective of commands, and all leaving the ranks. commanding officers of regiments will frequently during the march pass along the lines of the regiment to see that the ranks are closed up, nd that company officers are present with and attending to the proper order of their companies, arresting all neglecting their duty or absent without authority, detailing a field-officer, or officer next in rank to himself, to follow in rear to see these orders executed. Upon arriving in camp, the brigade guard will immediately take measures to protect houses in the vicinity, sentinels being placed to prevent those of the command form overrunning the houses or depredations being committed upon their grounds. Where forage, wood, or other necessaries eh, they must be obtained through the proper staff officers, who will purchase for the use of the command. Officers have been allowed as inspectors to division commanders, and these inspectors will examine the company and regimental papers, and see that a proper system of accountability prevails; that company officers make proper returns and have given proper receipts for all arms in their possession, and that all property issued to soldiers has been duly charged where lost, and measures taken to indemnify the Government for losses sustained though carelessness or neglect. Quartermasters and commissaries will be compelled to remain with their trains, their accounts will be examined, property on hand inspected,and where disobedience of orders or misappropriation of property appears, report fact to commanding general for correction. The destruction of private property in attributed in a great measure to teamsters and quartermaster's attaches, who tear down fences whenever halting temporarily to cook or park their train, without regard to damage to private property. Inspectors should, therefore, be actively and constantly employed in seeing that orders issued have been received, and if not, advising the ignorant, and, where known, seeing that they are properly executed, as, upon their activity and energetic performance of duty, commanders will be advised of the condition of their commands and be enabled to adopt necessary means to secure their efficiency. A permanent provost guard, under and efficient, energetic, and firm officer, will be established in each army corps, to which all prisoner will be turned over, either those captured or those under general charges, who, in addition to their duties as guard, will perform provost duty in correcting and punishing violations of orders coming under their observation. Commanding officers of regiment having instructed officers of their commands to look to their good order on the march and elsewhere, will arrest all neglecting this duty; this system will be carried up through the different grades.

The commanding general is satisfied that you feel the same solicitude with himself for the advancement of our cause, and earnestly appeals to you to impress your general and other officers, by personal explanations, and calls upon their sense of duty and interest in that success which alone can preserve to them everything they hold dear in this life, making every necessary effort to bring about a better state of discipline, and to impress men and officers with the importance of a change necessary to the preservation of this army and its successful accomplishment of its mission, as its better discipline, greater mobility, and higher inspirations must counterbalance the many advantages over us, both in numbers and material, which the enemy possess.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. H. CHOLTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.