War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0577 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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[Received at signal station, November 13, 1862-11.30 p.m.]

General PARKE:

Upon the receipt of General Sturgis' first dispatch, I sent him the following instructions:

It is important to prevent the enemy from gaining command of the ford, even with their artillery, and I hope your disposition will be such as to prevent it; nor should the enemy's pickets be allowed to push up very close to the ford.

To which I have received the following reply:

The general's dispatches received. I would state, for his information, that I had already sent the cavalry at my disposal-a regiment of infantry-to clear the hill, and put out a picket in advance. This I did in writing my previous notes, in consideration of the fact that night was fast approaching, and it was necessary to secure our position before dark. I have now no fear of my position.

I only transmit report from the line for the sake of information. Have been to Waterloo. General Whipple is in good position there. A report came in that some of our cavalry had been cut off; five of our infantry stragglers were captured and rescued. The reports from Waterloo and Sulphur Springs agree in the number of the enemy's cavalry squadrons.

WILLCOX,

General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEFENSES OF WASHINGTON,

Numbers 7.

November 13, 1862.

Colonel James A. Tait, First District of Columbia Volunteers, is hereby appointed provost-marshal-general of the forces south of the Potomac, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly. He will report for instructions at Headquarters Defenses South of the Potomac.

By command of Major-General Heintzelman:

CHAUNCEY McKEEVER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CUMBERLAND, MD.,

November 13, 1862-11.30 p.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I have reliable information that Jackson, with a large force, has left Winchester, and is moving this way, for the purpose, undoubtedly, of carrying out his favorite policy-to destroy the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and then recapture Northwestern Virginia. I have advised Generals Morell and Cox. I deem it my duty also to advise you. I have not sufficient force to repel him.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Railroad Division.

(The same to General Burnside.)

CUMBERLAND, MD.,

November 13, 1862-11.30 p.m.

General MILROY, Beverly, Va.:

We have reliable information that Jackson, with a large force, has left Winchester, coming this way. He is evidently going to attempt to carry

37 R R-VOL XIX, PT II