War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0573 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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personal good fortune of each of you will be always a matter of heart-felt interest to me. The professional successes you will attain will be doubly grateful to me, inasmuch as they will be identified with the success of our cause.

Among the most gratifying of my thoughts of you will be the assurance that you subordination and loyalty will remain, in the future as in the past, firm and steadfast to our country and its authorities.

F. J. PORTER,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Cincinnati, Ohio, November 12, 1862-9 p.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

General Cox telegraphs that information has been received from General Kelley, dated yesterday, that Jackson with 40,000 men, had returned to Winchester, and was moving northward, by way of Romney and Cumberland, and that 135 cavalry passed through Bloomery Gap the day before. This comes to General Kelley from Lieutenant-Colonel Moss. General Kelley has been directed by General Cox to verify this, if possible.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

(Copy to Burnside).

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WESTERN VIRGINIA,

Charleston, November 12, 1862

Major N. H. McLEAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Cincinnati, Ohio:

Received last night the following dispatch from Brigadier-General Kelley:

MOOREFIELD, HARDY COUNTY, VA., November 10.

I left New Creek on Saturday morning, the 8th instant, and after a continuous march of twenty-four hours, a distance of about 60 miles, reached Imboden's camp, on the South Fork, 18 miles south of this place, at 6.30 a.m. yesterday morning. We attacked him at once, and routed him completely, killing and wounding many of the enemy, capturing his camp, 50 prisoners a quantity of arms, 358 fat hogs, a large number of horses, cattle, wagons,&c. The infantry were routed and entirely dispersed, fleeing to the mountains. Their cavalry were, unfortunately, far away on an expedition or our success would have been complete. We burned their camp, and returned to this place this evening. The infantry are carried in wagons.

J. D. COX,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS,

Charleston, November 12, 1862.

Brigadier General B. F. KELLEY,

Near Creek or Cumberland:

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your report of your descent on Imboden's camp; also of the report of Jackson's being at Winchester. Use every effort to verify this last report. The general commanding the district thanks you for your watchfulness and activity.

By command of Major-General Cox:

G. M. BASCOM,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.