War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0572 OPERATIONS IN N.VA.,W.VA.,MD.,AND PA. Chapter XXXI.

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of the old wharf, to enable cars and locomotives to be unloaded, and the railroad to be quickly used.

The floating wharf which you propose could be used very well for wagons until a new track could be graded and laid and a permanent wharf erected. I am preparing to commence work as soon as orders are received.

H. HAUPT.

In Charge of U. S. Military Railroads.

HAGERSTOWN, MD.,

November 11, 1862-11 p.m.

General BURNSIDE:

Following dispatch just received:

NEW CREEK, 10th.

Major-General MORELL:

Following dispatch received from Colonel Campbell this evening from Sir John's Run to General Kelley:

"Lieutenant-Colonel Moss, just returned from Bloomery road, reports that Jackson, with 40,000 men, re-entered Winchester, and is advancing northward, by way of Romney and Cumberland. Also that 135 cavalry passed through Bloomery Gap this evening."

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

GEO. W. MORELL,

Brigadier-General.

WARRENTON, [VA..]

November 12, 1862-7.10 p.m.

Brigadier-General WOODBURY,

Engineer Brigade, Nineteenth and F Streets, Washington, D. C.,:

Call upon the chief quartermaster, Colonel Rucker, to transport all your pontoons and bridge materials to Aquia Creek. Colonel Belger has been ordered to charter and send one hundred barges to Alexandria.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

Numbers 25.

Camp near Warrenton, Va., November 12, 1862.

By direction of the President of the United States, Major-General Hooker has been assigned to the command of this corps.

It has been my privilege to lead the little band of regulars, the permanent army of the United States, inheriting the names, the records, and the traditions of regiments that have borne the banner of our country through all its wars. It has been my privilege to lead noble regiments of volunteers, coming from different States, but becoming equally national through having the same purpose, the same dangers, and the same sufferings. Having shared their perils and privations in the camp, in the bivouac, on the march, and in half a score of bloody fields, to the officers and men of both classes I address myself.

The confidence which, if I may judge by your acts,you have reposed in me, it has been my earnest effort to meet and requite. The personal regard,which I am proud to feel that you bear toward me, is reciprocated by an ardent affection and a deep respect which time cannot efface. The