War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0557 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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one-half of the forces now in Western Virginia will be sufficient for holding the valley, and that the remainder can be safely withdrawn. The Tennessee regiments can be sent to General Rosecrans, and the remainder to Memphis. I cannot believe that under existing circumstances so large a force is required in Kentucky, and it is hoped that you will send at least a part of them to Memphis.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, November 8, 1862.,

Major General JACOB D. COX, Charlestown W. Va.:

Approving your views as to the extent to which the campaign in Western Virginia is practicable, I shall order the command of General Morgan here. The division should move with the least practicable delay, and, to hasten it as much as possible, a copy of the order will be telegraphed to General Spears, at Gallipolis. Should you need the services of the portion with you, you will retain it, of course.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, [November 8, 1862.]

Major General JACOB D. COX,

Commanding District of Western Virginia:

Order General Morgan, with his division, to Cincinnati. The Quartermaster's Department will provide transportation.

By order of Major-General Wright:

N. H. McLEAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

GENERAL ORDERS.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

Numbers 1.

Warrenton, Va., November 9, 1862.

In accordance with General Orders, Numbers 182, issued by the President of the United States, I hereby assume command of the Army of the Potomac.

Patriotism and the exercise of my every energy in the direction of this army, aided by the full and hearty co-operation of its officers and men, will, I hope, under the blessing of God, insure its success.

Having been a sharer of the privations and a witness of the bravery of the old Army of the Potomac in the Maryland campaign, and fully identified with them in their feeling of respect and esteem for General McClellan, entertained through a long and most friendly association with him, I feel that it is not as a stranger that I assume their command.

To the Ninth Corps, so long and intimately associated with me, I need say nothing; our histories are identical.

With diffidence for myself, but with a proud confidence in the unswerving loyalty and determination of the gallant army now intrusted to my care, I accept its control, with the steadfast assurance that the just cause must prevail.

A. E. BURNSIDE.

Major-General, Commanding.