War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0548 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXI.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, November 5, 1862.

Major General FRANZ SIGEL,

Commanding at Gainesville, Va.:

Would it be practicable and safe to start a train from Alexandria to-morrow morning, and run it through to Rectortown? Is there any break or obstruction in the track beyond Gainesville?

P. H. WATSON,

Assistant Secretary of War.

GAINESVILLE, VA., November 6, 1862-10 a. m.

P. H. WATSON,

Assistant Secretary of War:

The railroad is unobstructed to White Plains. General Franklin's corps is at that place. The cavalry will be sent out to reconnoiter the road, but I am afraid the train will arrive at White Plains before they can accomplish their mission.

F. SIGEL,

Major-General.

ALEXANDRIA DEPORT, November 6, 1862.

P. H. WATSON:

We were fixing the bridge temporarily to get cars over when another boat ran into the draw, and made another smash. I have ordered a temporary fixture, to enable us to get over the cars now on the Washington side, which are absolutely necessary to enable us to move at all. Everything must give way to this stern necessity, and no boats must pass the draw until the cars are over. You may hear complaints; if so, you will know the reason.

General Buckingham reported at Gainesville 1.40 p. m.

H. HAUPT.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, OFFICE OF CHIEF QUARTERMASTER, Camp at Rectortown, Va., November 6, 1862.

General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have to honor to report that I have ordered all the clothing, teams, and other quartermaster's property now on hand at the Harper's Ferry, Hagerstown, and Frederick deports, not absolutely required for issue to the troops left in the vicinity of those depots, to be sent to Washington. The quartermasters at Hagerstown and Frederick will remain for the present, but those at Harper's Ferry will return to Washington, and will come out on our new line to report to me. I made it a point not to accumulate supplies at these temporary depots, but I fear there were more left at Harper's Ferry than I had wished. The call for clothing, &c., however, was very pressing, as you will recollect, and the army marched before drawing their full supply.

I am, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

RUFUS INGALLS,

Lieutenant Colonel, Aide-de-Camp, and Chief Quartermaster.