War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0502 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXI.

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they had best be posted. The force herein mentioned he considers inadequate for the service designated, but he cannot spare additional troops for the purpose. He will ask that some cavalry and new levies of infantry be sent to Chambersburg, Hagerstown, and vicinity, to aid in guarding the Upper Potomac, and desires your opinion as to their strength and position. Reply immediately.

R. B. MARCY,

Colonel, &c.

NOTE.--If possible, get the reply to-night.

GEO. D. RUGGLES,

Colonel, &c.

HDQRS. ELEVENTH CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Fairfax Court-House, October 28, 1862--11 p. m.

Brigadier-General BAYARD, Chantilly:

The general commanding directs me to inform you that our scouts from Aldie and Bull Run Mountains have not yet returned. Will send report to you upon their arrival.

Scouts from Warrenton Junction report a force of about 600 cavalry and infantry at that place; a regiment of cavalry and about 50 infantry at Warrenton.

information has been received that troops are sent from Gordonsville to Culpeper as re-enforcements for Jackson's army.

So, for instance, the Forty-ninth North Carolina and Fifty-ninth Georgia left Culpeper on the 19th of October for Flint Hill.

No positive information in regard to Walker's troops, ;or their movements, at Upperville.

Inclosed find a telegraph dispatch from Colonel Price.

Please keep the general advised about your movements.

A dispatch just received informs our chief quartermaster that forage will be sent to-night for your command to Fairfax Station.

Have sent you two scouts, as requested.

I have the honor, general, to remain, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. W. ASMUSSEN,

Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, October 28, 1862--1.15 p. m.

General MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General:

I was told that blankets could be got from Philadelphia sooner than from any other point. I have asked Colonel Crosman to send me twenty thousand and some suits of underclothing, provided he can do so at once. If you authorize it, I will see that an equal quantity be deducted from my requisitions on Washington. I directed Colonel Sawtelle to consult you on the expediency of providing rubber or other kind of water proof horse blankets for our cavalry, artillery, and even wagon horses. I am of opinion that the measure would prove an economical one, particularly for cavalry. The Army of the Potomac is in motion. The Manassas Railroad should assemble all its resources immediately.

RUFUS INGALLS,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Aide-de-Camp, and Chief Quartermaster.