War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0481 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, OFFICE OF CHIEF QUARTERMASTER,

October 24, 1862-11 a. m.

Captain DANIEL G. THOMAS,

Military Storekeeper, Washington:

Please send to Captain Bliss, at Harper's Ferry, 10,000 blankets, 12,000 caps, 5,000 overcoats (foot), 10,000 pairs bootees, 2,000 pairs artillery and cavalry boots, 15,000 pairs stockings, 15,000 drawers, 15,000 pants.

The clothing arrives slowly. Can it not be hurried along faster? May I ask you to obtain authority for this shipment?

RUFUS INGALLS,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Aide-de-Camp, and Chief Quartermaster.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WESTERN VIRGINIA, Gallipolis, October 24, 1862.

Colonel JONATHAN CRANOR,

Commanding Brigade, Guyandotte:

SIR: The best information seems now to indicate a concentration of the rebels at or near Charleston. It is very desirable to get reliable news from the country above you, and you will, if possible, open and keep up communication with our forces at Red House and Winfield, on the Kanawha, so as to know at all times what is between you and them. If everything is quiet between you and the Sandy, an expedition, scouting carefully toward the mouth of Coal River, will have a good effect in gathering intelligence which may be valuable, as well as clearing that region of guerrillas. In making such an expedition, if your circumstances render it feasible, you will give such instructions as will avoid any dangers of collision between our own men from the different lines.

No report has been received from you for two or three days.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. COX,

Major-General, Commanding.

[OCTOBER 24, 1862.-For Wright to Cox, see Series I, Vol. XVI, Part II, p. 642.]

GALLIPOLIS, October 24, 1862.

General R. H. MILROY, Buckhannon:

Yours of yesterday received. My purpose is as heretofore stated, namely, your force to operate toward Monterey, but not to leave your rear lines unprotected, while General Crook moves toward Summerville. His column, being smaller, will have to move solidly, while the protection of the lines of communication will devolve upon you. Major Bascom's dispatch yesterday, being directed to both of you, spoke of my anxiety to have a move made in direction of Summerville, supposing there would be no doubt as to which column that remark had reference. Transportation will have to be hired from the country for both you and Crook, so far as necessary. In your advance it will be needful to keep your force well in hand, and obtain, from General Kelley all the infor-

31 R R-VOL XIX, PT II