War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0453 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

truth. I am persuaded that a careful and thorough examination of prisoners, East and West, in this manner, would give a reasonably accurate view of the entire military strength of the rebellion.

I have the honor to be, with much respect, your obedient servant,

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

Return of forces under command of Major General Robert E. Lee, C. S. Army, previous to battle of Antietam.

Major General T. J. Jackson's corps ............................ 24,778

Major General James Longstreet's corps ......................... 23,342

Major General D. H. Hill's corps ............................... 15,255

Major General J. E. B. Stuart's cavalry ........................ 6,400

Ransom's and Jenkins' brigades ............................. 3,000

Forty-six regiments, not included above, 400 [each] ........ 18,400

Artillery (estimated) four hundred guns .................... 6,000

-------

Total for duty ............................................. 97,175

JOHN S. CLARK,

Colonel and Aide-de-Camp.

OCTOBER 6, 1862.

FAIRFAX COURT-HOUSE, October 20, 1862.

General BAYARD:

I have just returned from Centreville, where I had a conversation with General Stahel. He says that the force at Warrenton consisted of two regiments of cavalry (the Nineteenth North Carolina and the Second Virginia), of one battery, and about two infantry regiments. Captain Conger, who had a skirmish yesterday between Catlett's Station and Warrenton Junction, reports the enemy's troops consisted of about 50 infantry and 150 cavalry. At the same time he saw one engine and six cars. The engine had steam up, and his impression is that the infantry came from Rappahannock. The enemy did load iron and wheels, left on the road and the Catlett's. I have no certainty of what is at Culpeper or Gordonsville. My last information was there was only small force at Culpeper. One of our spies was captured near Culpeper, and one, who was sent to Sperryville, has not returned.

F. SIGEL,

Major-General.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington, October 20, 1862.

Major General GEORGE B. McCLELLAN,

Commanding Army of the Potomac, Charlestown, Va.:

GENERAL: In view of the numerous requests now being made by commanders in the field, that artillery batteries in service may retain the extra lieutenants, sergeants, and corporals, I am directed by the Secretary of War to inform you that all light batteries, having six guns and the requisite number of privates, will be allowed the additional commissioned and non-commissioned officers, as described in General Orders, Numbers 126. Such officers, however, in batteries which have only four guns, or are so reduced in strength as to be equivalent to four-gun batteries, will be mustered out of service from the date of receipt of the said order, if such has not already been done.