War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0450 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA.

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CHAP. XXXI.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 19, 1862-1.10 p.m. (Received 5.10 p.m.)

Colonel J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

The officers named in your dispatch of 12.35 have been ordered to appear before the court of inquiry in Washington. The court will now have before them the commanders of the Fifth Corps-of one of its divisions and of all the brigades of that division.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 19, 1862.

General R. E. LEE,

Commanding Army of Northern Virginia:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that Lieutenant Colonel Frederick Myers, assistant quartermaster, U. S. Army, will leave Bolivar Heights at 9 o'clock to-morrow morning with the 27th wagons and teams furnished to General White, U. S. Volunteers, by General A. P. Hill, of the Confederate Army, At Harper's Ferry, in September last, and will proceed with them on the Harper's Ferry and Charlestown road till met by Captain Janney. I have also to request that you will order teamsters to be in readiness to receive the teams.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

CENTREVILLE, October 19, 1862-8 p.m.

Captain ASMUSSEN,

Fairfax Court-House:

Captain Conger was attacked between Bristoe and Catlett's Station, and probably routed. Three men of Captain Conger's detachment, who fled, came in just now, and bring this report. Telegraph to Fairfax Station to keep the troops in readiness, and to send out good patrols toward and to Manassas Junction, where 35 men of ours are stationed. If you can spare cavalry, send some to Fairfax Station. Has General Heintzelman sent the 100 men to Fairfax Station?

Acknowledge.

F. SIGEL,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAMP,

October 19, 1862-9.45 a.m.

Lieutenant Colonel A. P. PORTER,

Commissary of Subsistence, Frederick City, Md.:

Loud complaints are made by the railroad company that a large number of cars, laden with subsistence stores, are detained at Frederick Depot; that there is great delay in unloading them. How is this? If stores are coming in too fast, the supply from Washington had best be stopped for three or four days.

H. F. CLARKE,

Colonel, Aide-de-Camp, and Commissary of Subsistence.