War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0422 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA.

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[CHAP. XXXI.

exposed to capture if they were sent across the river in the face of such a force as was reported to be there. Stoneman has been instructed to watch all the fords as high as the mouth of the Monocacy. I would suggest that a sufficient guard of infantry and artillery be sent from Washington to hold the fords from Great Falls to the Seneca Creek. This will enable Stoneman to concentrate his force more upon his line. With my small cavalry force it is impossible for me to watch the line of the Potomac properly, or even make the reconnaissances that are necessary for our movements. This makes it necessary for me to weaken my line very much by extending the infantry to guard the innumerable fords. This will continue until the river rises, and it will be next to impossible to prevent the rebel cavalry raids. My cavalry force, as I urged this morning, should be largely and immediately increased, under any this morning, should be largely and immediately increased, under any hypothesis, whether to guard the river or advance on the enemy, or both.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington City, October 14, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 13th instant, stating that complaint is made by General McClellan of the inadequate supply of cavalry horses for his command, and that the authority of the Quartermaster-General has been for a long time unrestricted in that regard, and that he is expected to spare no effort to procure and adequate supply.

You also call for a report as to what efforts have been made, and are now making, by the Quartermaster's Department for that purpose, and whether any, and what, authority, aid, or instructions can be given by the Secretary of War to accomplish the object.

I have also seen a dispatch from General McClellan to General Halleck on this subject, in which he states that the measures taken are not sufficient, and that the supply to the army under his command, including that in front of Washington, has averaged only 150 horses per week, from which the artillery also is supplied.

General McClellan has fallen into misapprehension on this subject. I find, by reports in this office, that there issued from this depot to the army under General McClellan, including that in front of Washington-

Horses.

From 1st to 30th of September......................... 4,493

From 1st to 11th of October........................... 3,261

Lieutenant-Colonel Ingalls, chief quartermaster of the

Army of the Potomac, under a special authority from

this office to meet an exigency, purchased in

Harrisburg, and received for issue.....................1,000

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Total..................................................8,754 In addition to this, there were sent toward Centreville

on the 1st day of September, on an order from General

Pope, and not included in the above....................1,500

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Total.................................................10,254

Thus the issues for the past six weeks to the army under General McClellan have been at the weekly average of 1,459 horses, and if the 1,500 horses sent to General Pope, just as the command was assumed by General McClellan, be taken into consideration, the weekly average issue has been, 1,709.