War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0371 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

September 30, [1862]-10.45 p.m.

General E. V. SUMNER,

Commanding Harper's Ferry:

General Stoneman reports from Poolesville this afternoon that a man from Hamilton, Va., informed him that last night there passed down from Winchester to Leesburg, on the turnpike, one regiment of cavalry and four pieces of artillery. He is informed that to-day and to-morrow are the days set for collecting conscripts in Loudoun County. In view of this, the general commanding desires you to send out toward Leesburg to-morrow morning a brigade of infantry, with a battery of artillery, and sufficient cavalry to scout the roads well in front and on the right flank as they advance, and if the rebel force remains at Leesburg, to attack it, and capture or drive it away. The cavalry should be kept sufficiently far out on the right flank to give notice of the approach of any large force from the direction of Winchester, to give time for our troops to fall back to Harper's Ferry, or to cross the river below, if necessary.

R. B. MARCY,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

September 30, 1862-10 a.m. (Received 12.15 p.m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

From all the information I can obtain, I am satisfied that the mass of the rebel army has left Martinsburg and marched for Winchester, where, it is said, they will make a stand and await our approach. They have been forcing every man they could find, capable of bearing arms, into their ranks. They have compelled the farmers to bring their grain to their army, and they have thereby caused great dissatisfaction among the people of Northern Virginia.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., September 30, 1862.

Major-General McCLELLAN:

Information received to-day confirms the report that the enemy is massing a strong force at Culpeper.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

NEAR SHARPSBURG, September 30, 1862.

General MEIGS:

There are very competent quartermasters at Harper's Ferry, as well as at Frederick and Hagerstown. The roads so far have not forwarded supplies as promptly as required, particularly the Cumberland Valley Railroad, which disappointed us greatly. Doubtless they will improve. There are provost-marshals at the railroad stations to see that no improper persons go on the cars. It is not the business of our quartermasters. I have requested that the provost-marshals be made to perform their duty.

RUFUS INGALLS,

Brigadier-General, Chief Quartermaster.