War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0325 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF WASHINGTON,

September 18, 1862 - 1.30 p. m.

Brigadier General GEORGE STONEMAN, Poolesville:

The following telegram, just received from General Heintzelman, is sent for your information:

Colonel Davies reports more definitely as to the enemy's force found at Leesburg. It was about 200 cavalry and 500 infantry; the latter composed of the force previously reported at Edwards Ferry and recovered sick and stragglers.

RICH'D B. IRWIN,

Captain, Aide-de-Camp, and Actg. Asst. Adjt. General

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF WASHINGTON,

Washington, September 18, 1862 - 10 p. m.

Major-General HEINTZELMAN,

Commanding Defenses, Arlington, Va.:

Referring to your indorsement on General Birney's report of the 17th, the commanding general thinks it will be best for you to attempt the burial of the dead under a flag of truce. If the enemy will not receive the flag, we can afterward try and accomplish the object by a strong armed party.

RICH'D B. IRWIN,

Captain, Aide-de-Camp, and Actg. Asst. Adjt. General

POINT OF ROCKS, MD.,

September 18, 1862.

Captain ECKERT:

Went to Sandy Hook. Line all right to Harper's Ferry Bridge, except between two poles. Thirty rebel pickets this side of the bridge, but were about leaving when I left, at 5 o'clock. There are less than 200 rebels in Harper's Ferry. No artillery. A large fire broke out as I was leaving, probably the pontoon bridge and Government property. The tents left by our troops remain standing. A rebel lieutenant told two women, who left Harper's Ferry at noon, that they were surrounded, and should leave as soon as possible. A negro from Shepherdstown states that the rebels attempted to cross the river last night, but, water being too deep, many were drowned. Our men that were killed on Maryland Heights during Saturday's fight are still unburied. The rebel killed and wounded were about 355 in that day's fight. Citizens of Sandy Hook are burying our dead. We will go in advance as soon as relieved, and thence to Harper's Ferry. The bridge at Harper's Ferry was burned, but the piers are good. They tried five times to blow them up, but did not succeed.

WM. C. HALL,

Operator.

ALEXANDRIA, VA., September 18, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

The Nineteenth Regiment of Connecticut Volunteers has just reported, under orders from General Casey, to relieve the Thirty-third Massachu-