War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0278 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXI.

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PHILADELPHIA DEPOT, PA.,

September 12, 1862.

JOHN TUCKER,

Assistant Secretary of War:

Have arranged about howitzers. People at navy-yard strongly advise use of gunboats as most efficient at Susquehanna, Bush, and Gunpowder Rivers. These would make everything there safe. Can you do anything to help me get them? They should be light-draught. Telegraph answer. Am informed there are plenty at Washington.

S. M. FELTON.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DEPOT,

Carlisle Barracks, Pa., September 12, 1862.

Brigadier General LORENZO THOMAS,

Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: At the request of His Excellency Gov. A. G. Curtin, I have sent my permanent party, mounted, at daylight this morning, to operate in front of the rebel pickets, between Chambersburg and the Maryland line, and to give some degree of confidence to the inhabitants, as well as to prevent a panic, which was rather imminent among the more easily frightened portion of the people in that neighborhood.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. H. HASTINGS,

Captain First Cavalry, Commanding.

PHILADELPHIA, September 12, 1862-4 p. m.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT:

The emergency demands the assignment of a competent general, to take command in this city. Peculiar circumstances affecting our State military organization make such measure absolutely necessary. I join with Governor Curtin in urging this upon your immediate attention, and asking a reply.

Very respectfully,

ALEX. HENRY.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C., September 12, 1862.

Honorable ALEXANDER HENRY, Philadelphia:

Yours of to-day received. General Halleck has made the best pro vision he can for generals in Pennsylvania. Please do not be offended when I assure you that in my confident belief Philadelphia is in no danger. Governor Curtin has just telegraphed me:

I have advices that Jackson is crossing the Potomac at Williamsport, and probably the whole rebel army will be drawn from Maryland.

At all events, Philadelphia is more than 150 miles from Hagerstown, and could not be reached by the rebel army in ten days, if no hinderance was interposed.

A. LINCOLN.