War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0266 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXI.

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HARPER'S FERRY, VA.,

September 11, 1862-1.50 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Report here that Jackson and Lee encamped at Boonsborough last night with 40,000 to 60,000 men, and that the enemy is leaving Frederick.

D. S. MILES,]

Colonel Second Infantry.

BALTIMORE, MD.,

September 11, 1862-8.20 a. m.

Major General H. V. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

On my return to this city I sent you two telegrams on the subject of my leaving this city. I am satisfied it will not do to leave at this time. I don not behave that Philadelphia is in the least danger, while Baltimore is in danger from within as well as from without. I, therefore, desire to hear from you on the subject, and I will not leave until I do. General White informs me that 15,000 rebel infantry, cavalry, and artillery passed through Boonsborough last night. Probable destination, Hagerstown.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., September 11, 1862.

Major-General WOOL:

Another officer will be detailed for Philadelphia. The Sixth Massachusetts should be sent here, unless you need their services in Baltimore.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

BALTIMORE, MD.,

September 11, 1862-12 noon.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

A person living in this city, in whom General [Edward] Shriver has the utmost confidence, says that he was in Frederick yesterday; that the rebels broke up their encampment at 1.30 a. m., and marched in the direction of Hagerstown, Stonewall Jackson leading. He saw them marching from 5 a. m. until 9 p. m., when he left; principally infantry and artillery. According to report, three hundred pieces of artillery, with some very large ones. He says Generals Lee and Jackson, Brigadier-General Cobb, and several other generals, were present. Brigadier-General Walker was still to pass with his brigade. He saw, as he supposed from reports, 5,000 cavalry near New Market, which had not yet left. He saw many pieces of cannon, with the letters U. S.; also many horses, mules, and wagons, with the same letters. The report was that the troops were going into Pennsylvania. The informant further says that the people were not under any restraint, and had permission to come and go as they pleased.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.