War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0259 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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practicable. Take in haversacks two days' provisions, as much as possible in wagons; beef on the hoof; also ammunition. You remain as essential to the defenses on your side. General Humphreys will be assigned to the command of the division.

F. J. PORTER,

Major-General.

ARLINGTON, September 11, 1862-9.15 p. m.

General GRIFFIN:

Send out hour notice at once to all your regiments that they will be required to march to-morrow morning. The hour will be given as soon as possible. Three day's rations in haversacks.

F. J. PORTER,

Major-General, Commanding.

ARLINGTON, September 11, 1862-10.10 p. m.

General GRIFFIN:

Have your command at Fort Corcoran at 7.45 a. m. to-morrow, ready to fall into the column. Fill your haversacks and canteens, and take as much provision as possible in wagons. Acknowledge.

F. J. PORTER,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., September 11, 1862.

GENERAL: In obedience to your orders, I left this city at midnight, August 30, 1862, and proceeded as rapidly as possible to Centreville, Va., where, at 6 a. m., on Sunday, August 31, I reported in person to Major-General Pope, to whom I exhibited my instructions. Acquainting myself as rapidly as possible with the situation of affairs, I decided upon the following course: First, to remove the wounded from the hospitals at Bull Run, in advance of Centreville, and to transfer the whole establishment, surgeons, nurses, cooks, cooking apparatus, and medical supplies, to Fairfax Station, where there were subsistence stores, and where the wounded could receive food and medical attendance before being transferred to the railroad cars to be forwarded to this city. Medical Inspector Edward P. Vollum, who superintended the transfer, reports that it was safely accomplished, and that the number removed was about 1,200. Finding it impossible, on account of the presence of the enemy, to remove our wounded from Manassas Junction and Bristoe Station, I commenced emptying the overcrowded hospitals at Centreville, and placed the first train of wounded from the ambulances to the cars, and to send back to me all ambulances as rapidly as possible. After giving these orders and seeing that they were being executed, I went to Major-General Pope and stated that I had been informed that a large number of our wounded were still lying on the battle-field, and requested that he would apply for a flag of truce, that they might be removed. The general made the application immediately. The reply granting the flag was communicated to Medical Director McParlin, Sunday evening, too late to proceed that night. I, however, ordered Medical Director McParlin to have his trains of ambulances ready, and to procure from