War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0251 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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PHILADELPHIA, PA.,

September 10, 1862-10.02 a. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

Under our militia laws we are utterly defenseless, and, besides, are clogged with commanders who cannot be removed. Therefore, we ask for a military governor, to be appointed by the President. We implore you to give us one who combines the sagacity of the statesman with the acuteness and skill of the soldier. Give us a man whose heart is in the war, and who has no sympathy with secession or its adherents in this city.

THOMAS WEBSTER.

MORTON McMICHAEL.

JOHN W. FORNEY.

PHILADELPHIA, September 10, 1862-1.20 p. m.

To the PRESIDENT AND SECRETARY OF WAR:

The Philadelphia chef commissioners for drafting respectfully represent to the President and Secretary of War the immediate necessity of putting the city and its defenses under the charge of United States military general officers having the public confidence, such as General O. M. Mitchel, with General George G. Meade.

B. GERHARD.

WM. H. ALLEN.

PHILADELPHIA, PA.,

September 10, 1862-2.45 p. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

In reply to your dispatch, we most earnestly recommend that General Mitchel be detached from his command in South Carolina, and assigned to duty here, with extensive powers. He is the very man for us. Please answer. We understand that the general has not yet sailed.

THOMAS WEBSTER.

MORTON McMICHAEL.

JOHN W. FORNEY.

WASHINGTON, D. C.,

September 10, 1862-5 p. m.

THOMAS WEBSTER.

MORTON McMICHAEL.

JOHN W. FORNEY,

Committee, Philadelphia:

Before receiving your last telegram, Major-General Wool had been ordered to proceed to Philadelphia. The condition of affairs in the Southern Department requires the immediate presence of General Mitchel in his command, and, while confiding in his loyalty and courage, he would not, in my opinion, begin to fill your bill.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.