War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0250 Chapter XXXI. OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA.

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important that he should see you at the earliest moment possible. Do not detail a general officer for Pennsylvania until he sees you. The rebels are now in Cumberland Valley, and it is fair to presume their object is the capture of the capital of Pennsylvania. What can you do t aid with forces to meet this movement of Jackson? We are destitute of artillery to defend the passage of the Susquehanna. Can your order guns and ammunition to-night, from Pittsburgh and Eastern points, to concentrate at Harrisburg immediately, using special trains on all the railroads? Please answer.

THOMAS A. SCOTT.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, September 10, 1862.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Philadelphia, Pa.:

If there should be any real necessity to send guns and ammunition from Pittsburgh, it will be ordered. The way to defend the Cumberland Valley is to send all available means of attack here. It will be time enough to order arms and ammunition from Pittsburgh when they are really needed.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

PHILADELPHIA, PA., September 10, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

We want an active, energetic officer to command forces in the field, and one that could rally Pennsylvania around him. It is believed that General Reynolds would be the most useful, and I hope you will arrange to send him after your interview with Colonel Wright in the morning, who will explain fully all the reasons.

THOMAS A. SCOTT.

PHILADELPHIA, PA.,

September 10, 1862-10 a. m.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT:

The undersigned, citizens of Philadelphia, in view of the inadequate organization of its local troops and the deficient means of defense against a hostile army, respectfully and earnestly entreat Your Excellency to create a military district of this city and the adjacent country, and to assign a general of known energy and capacity to the command thereof, with instructions to adopt whatever measures of security may be needful in the present crisis.

THOS. ROBINS,

President Philadelphia Bank;

THOS. SMITH,

President Bank of North America;

S. A. MERCER,

President Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank;

and the president of other banks and institutions, and by citizens generally.

If the President will favor the memorialist with a reply, it may be addressed to J. R. Fry on their behalf.