War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0247 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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importance that all troops possible be sent here while the communications open. If closed, then they must be organized north of the Susquehanna. The best way to defend Pennsylvania now is to concentrate our forces on the enemy, and not to scatter them in weak parties at several points. An officer of high rank will sent to Harrisburg, to act as exigencies may require.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HARRISBURG, PA.,

September 10, 1862-11.45 a. m.

General H. W. HALLECK:

Have just received your message. Colonel Wright, of my staff, will go to Washington to confer with you in regard to military affairs in Pennsylvania. Please see him early to-morrow, so that he may return promptly.

A. G. CURTIN,

Governor of Pennsylvania.

HARRISBURG, PA.,

September 10, 1862-3.30 p. m.

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

A paroled Union man just arrived at Hagerstown from Frederick, fully credited by operator. He reports he passed General Jackson, with a large force, on the National road, between Middletown and Boonsborough, at 9 this morning. General Jackson commanded in person. Body-guard of cavalry in front, followed by infantry, and cavalry in rear. Middletown is 18 miles, and Boonsborough 10 miles, from Hagerstown. Sharpsburg road, leading to Harper's Ferry, is half mile beyond Boonsborough. The sheriff of Hagerstown, a reliable Union man, has informed the operator that he met rebel scout, a personal friend, to-day, who advised him to leave Hagerstown immediately. The Cumberland Valley is entirely undefended, and we are entirely without force here. I have sent Captain Palmer, of Buell's body-guard, to Greencastle, to put mounted men from Hagerstown toward Hancock, Williamsport, Harper's Ferry, and Frederick. He has no horses. Hundred and fifty regular cavalry and horses at Carlisle. Can't they be ordered to report at once to Captain Palmer, Greencastle? Please instruct him also to press horses into service, and receipt for same for a few days. I asked General Wool to do so this morning, but he has not answered.

A. G. CURTIN,

Governor of Pennsylvania.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, September 10, 1862.

Governor CURTIN, Harrisburg, Pa.:

Major-General Wool has been assigned to the duty of organizing the military forces forth of the Susquehanna. He will be in Philadelphia to-morrow morning. Communicate with him there.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.