War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0230 Chapter XXXI. OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA.

Search Civil War Official Records

HARRISBURG, PA., September 9, 1862-4 p. m.

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Please define the duties which General Andrew Porter is expected to perform. He is here without definite instructions, and feels somewhat embarrassed. I hope you will give him ample power to organize and direct the movement of forces in this region. He then can be of great service to me. Please answer.

A. G. CURTIN,

Governor of Pennsylvania.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTH ARMY CORPS,

Baltimore, September 9, 1862.

Honorable ANDREW G. CURTIN,

Governor of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, Pa.:

SIR: Send the New York regiments forward to Washington. I have no companies to send from here to Cockeysville and vicinity. If you have a Pennsylvania regiment, you are authorized to use it for the defense of the Northern Central Railroad. If you have not a regiment to spare, send as many companies as you can. We have just received muster-rolls for three companies of Colonel Wister's regiment. General Burnside is within a few miles of the rebel pickets with a large force. General McClellan is also marching on.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

HARRISBURG, PA., September 9, 1862.

Major-General McCLELLAN, Rockville:

The operator at Hanover just telegraphs that the main body of the enemy, believed to be over 100,000 strong, are within a few miles of Frederick and north of the city. The enemy's cavalry have not been nearer than 18 miles to Hanover, and no rebels have appeared at Gettysburg or in that direction. A deserter from the rebel army just in at Hanover confirms above statement, which was gathered from Union refugees. Telegraph offices reopened at Hagerstown this evening. Operator reports all quiet, and no evidence of enemy in that region.

THOMAS A. SCOTT.

PHILADELPHIA, PA., September 9, 1862.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT:

SIR: By instructions, I have the honor to communicate to you the opinions of the citizens of Philadelphia on the exposed condition of their city, and their utter want of means of defense. With the hope that their views may receive your immediate attention, I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS WEBSTER,

Vice-Chairman.

At a meeting of Citizens' Bounty Fund Committee, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted:

Whereas the rapid advances of rebel armies into Western Maryland, and toward the border of Pennsylvania, renders it absolutely necessary that something should be