War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0214 Chapter XXXI. OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

Numbers 229.

HDQRS. OF THE ARMY, ADJT. General 'S OFFICE,

Washington, September 8, 1862.

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IV. Brigadier General J. K. F. Mansfield, U. S. Volunteers, is relieved from duty in the Army of Virginia, and will report in person to Major-General McClellan.

V. Brigadier General Andrew Porter, U. S. Volunteers, is assigned to duty in Pennsylvania to organize volunteers. He will report in person to Governor Curtin, at Harrisburg, Pa.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

Numbers 1.

HDQRS. DEFENSES OF WASHINGTON,

September 8, 1862.

I. In compliance with Paragraph VII of Special Orders, Numbers 4, of the 7th instant, from the headquarters of Major-General McClellan, the undersigned hereby assumes the immediate command of the defenses of the capital during the absence of the general commanding from Washington.

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III. With the permission of Major-General McClellan, Captain Richard B. Irwin, aide-de-camp to the general commanding, will act as assistant adjutant-general of this command.

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General.

HARRISBURG, PA.,

September 8, 1862-5.20 p. m. (Received 7.55 p. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

If it be possible to send a brigade of disciplined troops to this point, as a nucleus for an army, it ought to be done immediately, and then concentrate new regiments here until a large army is organized, to stop movements of enemy into Pennsylvania. The people need something to restore confidence, in order to get them to step forward in support of the Government. If no organization is made, they will leave en masse as the enemy approaches. From this point a column could be readily transferred to any other place where their service might be required. Can anything be done to meet this view of the case? Please answer.

THOMAS A. SCOTT.

BALTIMORE, MD.,

September 8, 1862-10 p. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I have been informed by Mr. Webster, residing in Westminster, that the rebel army is south and east of a line drawn around north of Frederick, and east in the direction of Westminster. He says the rebel army is 75,000 strong. He also says that General Burnside is between the rebel army and Baltimore. The person I sent out last evening