War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0212 Chapter XXXI. OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Rockville, Md., September 8, 1862-8.50 p. m.

(Received 11.30 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK:

Herewith I send you a telegram addressed to General Wool. Please read it. If you approve, have it put in cipher, and forward:*

HEADQUARTERS,

Rockville, Md., September 8, 1862-8.50 p. m.

Major General JOHN E. WOOL,

Commanding Department of Baltimore:

This army is now massed between Rockville and Brookville, in position to move on the enemy, should he attempt to go toward Baltimore from any point above here, to advance into Pennsylvania, or attack Washington. Our information regarding the enemy's movements is very vague and conflicting. If the enemy has crossed the Potomac in large force, it seems to use of great importance that we should co-operate fully, and it will give me great pleasure to have the benefit of any suggestion that your extended military experience may dictate. I shall, from time to time, keep you advised of all that occurs with me, and I shall feel under great obligations if you will give me such information as you may deem of importance to me. I should be especially gratified to learn everything that you can get regarding the movements of the enemy in the direction of Harper's Ferry and above. My scouts have been to day within 3 miles of Barnesville, and met a small force of the enemy, but encountered no large bodies of troops. They have also been to near Ridgeville, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, where they saw nothing of the enemy. I shall, to-morrow, send them across the railroad toward Liberty and New London, by which I hope to discover whether they are advancing from Frederick toward Baltimore. I shall also push out reconnaissances in various other directions.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, September 8, 1862.

Major General FITZ JOHN PORTER,

Fort Corcoran:

Three thousand sand-bags were recently sent to General Whipple, for forts then under his command. More can be supplied if required.

Guns are wanted for works on this side. Three 24-pounder siege guns are said to be disposable, having been replaced at Fort Barnard by others. By order of General McClellan, I directed them to be sent to Fort Pennsylvania. A number of rifled 30-pounders have been released from Fort Ramsay; I desire to have them on this side.

J. G. BARNARD,

Brigadier-General.

WASHINGTON, September 8, 1862.

General FITZ JOHN PORTER:

I wish two rifled siege guns sent to Fort Alexander; two to Fort Lincoln; one to Fort Mahan, and one to Fort Meigs. The three 24-pounders should be sent to Fort Pennsylvania. I do not think any guns should be put in Fort Runyon, when there is far more need of guns on this side, and this I understood to be General McClellan's view.

J. G. BARNARD,

Brigadier-General and Chief Engineer.

*See Wool to McClellan, September 9, p. 231.