War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0208 Chapter XXXI. OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA, MD., AND PA.

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SEPTEMBER 7, 1862-9.15 p. m.

Major-General WOOL, Baltimore:

Your telegram this evening has been received, and the General-in-Chief informs me that you have already received directions in respect to the Harrisburg train. I hope your officers and men are animated by your own gallant spirit, and that we shall have neither flights nor surrender in your command.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War

HARRISBURG, PA., September 7, 1862.

E. M. STANTON:

The guard upon the Northern Central Railroad consists of but two companies. Not at all sufficient to protect the bridges in Maryland. If an attempt should be made to destroy them, will you increase the force?

J. D. CAMERON,

Vice-President.

HANOVER, PA., via BALTIMORE,

September 7, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

Enemy, eight regiments infantry and one cavalry, with twelve pieces of artillery, encamped 2 miles north of Frederick yesterday evening. Scouts have been north 15 miles and east toward Baltimore 20 miles. They say their destination is Harrisburg, more probably Baltimore. I most earnestly solicit orders to join the army in such position as you may think fit, and leave for myself, aide, and horse to proceed to Baltimore by the next train. I will await orders here, having been compelled to leave Frederick to avoid capture.

JAMES COOPER,

Brigadier-General.

WASHINGTON, September 7, 1862.

Brigadier-General COOPER, Hanover, Pa.:

Your telegram received this evening has been referred to the General-in-Chief, who thinks that you may be able to render more service at Harrisburg than elsewhere at the present moment. You are, therefore, directed to proceed to Harrisburg and report to Governor Curtin for any duty that may be required in organizing the militia.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

BALTIMORE, MD.,

September 7, 1862-11.30 a. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Our inventory of rolling-stock being completed east of the Monocacy, we are able to estimate that, beginning after four hours' notice, we can take 28,000 men in one convoy of train from Washington to Baltimore or Elysville or vicinity, and can repeat the operation in from eighteen to