War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0201 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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there that all was quiet. Paroled prisoners say the rebels are moving on the road to Frederick, and are tearing up the rails on the road as they go. I hear that night before last the rebels had 50,000 men at Dranesville. This body may be kept there, to cross in this direction after we get engaged elsewhere. I will have them watched. The enemy have possession of Sugar Loaf Mountain, and have a signal station there. All quiet throughout my line up to 10 o'clock this morning.

A. PLEASONTON,

Brigadier-General.

WASHINGTON, September 7, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN,

Commanding, &c.:

I have just seen General Pleasonton's dispatch of 2.30. Until we can get better advices about the numbers of the enemy at Dranesville, I think we must be very cautious about stripping too much the forts on the Virginia side. It may be the enemy's object to draw off the mass of our forces and then attempt to attack from the Virginia side of the Potomac. Think of this. I will see you as soon as I can.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

MUDDY BRANCH, MD.,

September 7, 1862-6.40 p. m.

General R. B. MARCY:

Have just received the report of Colonel Farnsworth, Eighth Illinois Cavalry, of his occupation of Poolesville to-day. He drove the rebels, some 60 in number, from the town, capturing 3. One was badly wounded, and this man he paroled. The two others I sent to the Provost-Marshal-General. They belong to the Fifth Virginia Cavalry, Colonel Rosser. The most of the rebel cavalry went to Barnesville yesterday. A colored man reported to Colonel Farnsworth that he went to Barnesville yesterday, to carry ladies, who wanted to see the rebels. They told the ladies they were going to Frederick, and from thence to Baltimore. The rebel train finished crossing the river at Conrad's Ferry this morning, and passed in the direction of Frederick. This is probably the end of all that are coming over. Colonel Farnsworth has done very well, and shown good judgment.

A. PLEASONTON,

Brigadier-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C., September 7, 1862-8.20 p. m.

Major General GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN,

Commanding:

It being suggested that some of your cavalry have no carbines, I call your attention to the fact that there are 2,000 and upward, with accouterments and ammunition, ready for issue at the Washington Arsenal.

P. H. WATSON,

Assistant Secretary of War.