War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0181 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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abandoned the place; that 30,000 of the enemy have crossed the Potomac, and are marching on him. I have ordered him to halt and obstruct the road, and that I would support him.*

D. S. MILES,

Colonel Second Infantry.

BALTIMORE, [September] 4, 1862 - 10.30.

Colonel MILES,

Commanding Harper's Ferry:

Send the paroled prisoners, as you can obtain cars, to Cumberland. General White will either repair to this place or join the Army of the Potomac; but his troops and supplies will remain at Harper's Ferry until further orders, and you will dispose of them as circumstances may require. I have sent a regiment and a section of artillery to Monocacy Bridge. Answer immediately.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

[SEPTEMBER] 4, [1862.]

Colonel MILES, Harper's Ferry:

You will retain at Harper's Ferry, Va., all the troops there. Brigadier-General White can take his commissary witch him, but he will be assigned to duty as commissary of the post.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTH ARMY CORPS,

Baltimore, September 4, 1862.

Brigadier-General WHITE, Harper's Ferry:

GENERAL: You will repair to Martinsburg, Va., and take command of the troops at and near that station, instead of repairing to this city, as previously directed. You will adopt the most active and energetic measures to protect and defend that place and the road occupied by troops under you command. The most sleepless energy is expected.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE, [September --, 1862] - 10.30.

Colonel W. G. WARD,

[Twelfth Regiment New York State Militia], Harper's Ferry:

I thank you for you telegram. Surely your regiment will not desire to leave at the present, when their general asks them to remain a few days. They would not be well received at New York if they should return at this moment. They would be branded as cowards. I am not willing that they should lose their good name, when but a few days' delay will entitle them to carry the proud name, when but a few days' delay will entitle them to carry the proud name of brave soldiers. You and your officers, who consent to remain, merit the thanks of myself and of the whole country.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

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* See Wool to Miles, same date, Part I, p. 522.

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