War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0175 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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to ride out to-day, except in case of necessity, but have sent my aide in all directions. The shelling of the canal-boats is an old amusement of the rebels; it is probably a pretty strong proof that they do not intend to cross at Edwards Ferry.

Very respectfully, yours,

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, September 4, 1862.

Major-General McCLELLAN, Commanding, &c.:

Captain Yontz, at 11 a. m., reports that the enemy is shelling boats at Edwards Ferry. If cavalry ad artillery have not already been sent to that place, send some immediately. No details are given of enemy's forces.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS,

Washington, September 4, 1862.

General R. E. LEE,

Or Officer Commanding Troops in front of United States Lines:

GENERAL: I have sent Surgeon Moore, of the army, with a flag of truce to the front, accompanied by a burial party, for the purpose od interring the dead who may lie upon the field of the late battle near Bull Run. I request the courtesy of your permission to Surgeon Moore to perform the duties to which he has been assigned.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

AQUIA CREEK, VA.,

September 4, 1862 - 5 p. m.

Major General GEORGE B. McCLELLAN:

By morning I will have loaded all my troops, excepting a rear guard of one regiment of infantry and about 50 cavalry; also all the teams, wagons, quartermaster's stores, beef cattle, and a large portion of subsistence. There are seven engines and sixty cars; the majority of them poor. Two of the engines are very good. It would take about four days to load them if we had proper transportation. The cars should be loaded on barges, but they have not arrived. The engines could be removed on ferry-boats. Shall I remain with the rear guard until all are secured, or shall I destroy them, or shall I leave the commanders of the rear guard to secure that, that I may at once proceed to Washington?

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

AQUIA, VA., September 4, 1862 - 11.45 p. m.

Major-General McCLELLAN:

The last of my command, excepting the rear guard, will soon be off. I will leave definite instructions with the officer in command and be with you in the morning. The locomotives shall be saved if possible.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General, Commanding.