War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0173 Chapter XXXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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35 prisoners of war, who were taken from Captain Hunter and Curll's company. They state, also, that Captain Hunter and Lieutenant Milling and Lieutenant Gallagher are prisoners in the rebels' hands, who will not let them go until they find out whether they belong to General Pope's army or not. There are now in Leesburg one large regiment of cavalry and one of infantry, and they expect more this evening; so, if they should come to the river to cross, and I have one or two pieces of cannon, I will assure your honor they shall not come over.

W. H. H. YONTZ,

Captain, Commanding Company E and Post at Edwards Ferry.

FORT MONROE, September 3, 1862.

General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General, Washington:

I have no doubt Colonel Ingalls' sickness has much retarded the discharge and return of transports. the first week we had as many as could be loaded and unloaded; after which many of those best adapted to our purposes were transferred to other service. Had it not been for this interruption, everything connected with the Army of the Potomac would have been embarked in less than two weeks. Yesterday afternoon a large number of transports again arrived, and last night and today a very large business has been done. There is yet to embark only 4,800 horses, 320 wagons, and 80 ambulances. If the transports are promptly returned, as I now think from my dispatches they will be, we can finish on Saturday.

JOHN TUCKER,

Assistant Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, September 3, 1862.

Major-General WOOL, Baltimore:

The paroled prisoners are still here, and will remain till morning, for want of transportation. Reliable information has just been received here that 400 rebel cavalry came to Waterford at 3 o'clock this p. m., and placed the town under martial law, and have posted pickets on Hillsborough and Lovettsville road. There is also a small force at Leesburg, with pickets places half a mile on this side. It is also reported that the rebel wagon trains are at Gum Spring, only guarded by about 200 cavalry.

JOHN FASKIN,

Lieutenant Colonel Eighty-seventh Regiment Ohio. Vols., in Command.