War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0112 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXI.

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and that there was a heavy and rapid cannonading at Aldie for some time this p. m. These must have been Bayard's guns, as no guns were seen with Stuart. Bayard has a force of 5,000 cavalry and four guns. With this force he should be able to handle Stuart roughly. Stuart left a picket behind him on the turnpike, which will probably leave to-night.

I was not able to communicate the general's instructions to Bayard in consequence of these events. Please answer this message as soon as you receive it at Berlin.

A. PLEASONTON,

Brigadier-General.

General R. B. MARCY.

WHEATLAND, [November 1 [?], 1862 - 12.20 a. m.

(Sent at 4 a. m.)

GENERAL: Your dispatch of 10 p. m. received. * Enemy still in force at Snicker's Gap. They showed a strong force of cavalry at dusk. One of my parties lost a man, captured by them. There is a road on top of the mountain that turns the gap. I reconnoitered it this evening, and found it occupied by enemy's infantry.

This is through signal station.

PLEASONTON,

Brigadier-General.

General R. B. MARCY.

PURCELLVILLE, November 1, 1862 - 8.15 a. m.

GENERAL: Your dispatches of 7 and 9 p. m. received.* I am just starting for Philomont. Shall push my reconnaissance as [far] toward Upperville as I can to day. Have not heard from General Bayard. Have sent an aide to him this morning, if he can get through. I send you Colonel Gregg's statement concerning the men he wants for Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry, according to your request.

Very respectfully,

A. PLEASONTON,

Brigadier-General.

General MARCY.

PHILOMONT, November 1, 1862 - 11.30 a. m.

GENERAL: My command has arrived at this point, and I am now sending out scouts in different directions. About 100 of Stuart's rebel cavalry left this place hastily on our advance, and took the road to Middleburg. I am told there is a force of rebel cavalry and infantry at Upperville. Have not heard yet from General Bayard. My force is so small (not over 1,500 men) that I find myself obliged to work my men very hard to do the duty required of them.

For want of horses, the dismounted men left behind have not come up, and many of my old horses are becoming unfit for service, by disease called rotten-hoof.

Yesterday Stuart captured a number of First Rhode Island Cavalry

* Not found.