War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0070 Chapter XXXI. OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 11, 1862-8.30 p.m.

Brigadier-General STONEMAN, Poolesvile, Md:

COMMANDING OFFICER, Frederick, Md.:

The following dispatch has just been received from General Franklin:

HAGERSTOWN, October 11, 1862-7.45 p. m.

Brigadier General R. B. MARCY:

A discharged officer, named Hamilton, late quartermaster of Bartlett's brigade, was taken prisoner by Stuart last evening at Chambersburg, and paroled. He had, he says, a long talk with Stuart, who told him that he hat 3,000 cavalry. Would be in Gettysburg at 12 to day, and would cross the Potomac at mouth of Monocacy. If he found too large a force there, would go lower. Hamilton says there are about 1,900 cavalry. That a force of 300 was absent when they were counted this morning.

W. B. FRANKLIN,

Major-General.

P. S.-Stuart desired to be remembered kindly to General S Williams. This makes it look authentic.

W. B. F.

The cavalry, as counted this morning, referred above, by a Mr. McClelland, numbered about 1,644.

GEO. D. RUGGLES,

Colonel, &c.

BALTIMORE, October 11, 1862-2 a. m.

Governor CURTIN, Harrisburg:

I will send you to-morrow there regiments and a light battery of six pieces, and I will you to-morrow morning; perhaps not until 1 p. m.

JOHN E. WOOL

Major-General.

HARRISBURG, PA., October 11, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

General Wool arrived here to-day, and has assumed command. We have a very active enemy within the State. A prisoner was captured by the farmers 5 miles west of Gettysburg this afternoon. He says the

whole rebel force will be in Gettysburg to-night. I hope our military authorities will capture the force, with all their booty.

A. G. CURTIN,

Governor of Pennsylvania.

HARRISBURG, October 11 1862.

(Received October 11, 10.15 a. m.)

Major-General McCLELLAN, Knoxville:

I have requested the people of Fulton County to obstruct the turnpike road crossing Cove Mountain, from Mercersburg and Loudoun;

also all the roads from Mercersburg to Hancock, to prevent retreat in that direction, pleasing riflemen at each point in as large numbers as possible. The whole party ought to be captured, and I hope you can send force to do it.

A. G. CURTIN.