War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0068 Chapter XXXI. OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA.

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is above you, will probably come down the river to-day with four regiments of cavalry for the purpose of pursuing the rebels, and it is hoped they may not escape without punishment. Communicate often

R. B. MARCY,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 11, 1862-9.30 a. m.

General WILLIAM B. FRANKLIN, Hagerstown. Md.:

General Crook has his division in cars at Hancock, ready to move to any point above that place, if the rebels attempt to return that way. He has cavalry scouts out on all the roads toward the Pennsylvania line. Governor Curtin just telegraphs that he has requested the people of Fulton country to abstract the pikes crossing Cove Mountain, from Mercersburg and London, and has directed the people to turn out with their rifles to annoy the enemy as much as possible. He thinks the whole party may be captured, and hopes the general will send forces to do it.

R. B. MARCY,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DIVISION,

October 11, 1862-4 a. m.

General R. B. MARCY,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: Your dispatch of 10 p. m. of last evening is received. I cannot find out where McCoy's Ferry is, but presume it is near Hancock. I shall, therefore, move toward Hagerstown, and make inquiries as I proceed.

My command is very small, from the fast of many horses being unshod;

and shoes could not be had. The Eighth Pennsylvania

has not yet been able to obtain horses to replace the old ones of the Peninsula, now used up. Shall, however, do the best I can under the circumstances.

Very respectfully,

A PLEASONTON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Cavalry Division.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 11, 1862-12 m.

Brigadier-General PLEASONTON,

Hagerstown:

A report from Governor Curtin this morning states the rebel cavalry force camped at Chambersburg last night, and left there at 9 this morning the direction of Gettysburg. Force about 2,000 strong, consisting of Stuart's and Hampton's cavalry.

It is thought, by Mr. McClure, of Chambersburg, that they intend returning by way of Frederick and Leesburg.

You will at once move with your force, and all of Davis' cavalry, at Hagerstown, by Cavetown and Harmon's Gap, to Mechanicstown, where the Sixth Cavalry has been ordered to join you.

You will send scouts on the direct road from Hagerstown to Gettysburg, and also to Emmittsburg and beyond, to ascertain the movements