War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0067 Chapter XXXI. STUART'S EXPEDITION INTO MD. AND PA.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 11, 1862-1 p. m.

General AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE,

Commanding Army Corps:

General: The commanding general directs that von send, at once,two brigades to the railroad at Weverton, to be in readiness to take the cars to Frederick.

This is only a temporary thing, intended to defend Frederick and our deport at Monocacy until the rebel cavalry return from their raid into Pennsylvania.

The general desires you to report, in person, at these headquarters as soon as you give these orders.

Very respectfully,

R. B. MARCY,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS,

Hancock, October 11, 1862-8 a. m. (Received 10.20 a. m.)

General R. B. MARCY,

Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac:

This country is full of by-roads, and it is in my opinion impossible to intercept the rebels at McConnelsburg or in the interior place. I have my cavalry picketing all the roads in that section of the country, and my command is loaded on the cars here, ready to be thrown at once on any point where the rebels attempt to cross the river. I have not gained any information of the rebels since they crossed the river.

Yours, respectfully,

GEORGE CROOK,

Brigadier-General.

OCTOBER 11, 1862-9.30.

General CROOK, Hancock:

The general commanding directs that you send a brigade of your command and a battery to McConnellsburg, to remain until it is determined Which route the rebels will take on their return. It

is thought they will reach Gettysburg to-night. They marched from Chambersburg this morning.

R. B. MARCY,

Chief of Staff.

OCTOBER 11, 1862- 9. 30 a. m.

General GEORGE CROOK,

Commanding Division, Hancock, Md.:

Your dispatch of 8 a. m. received. The rebels, supposed to consist of four regiments of cavalry and four guns, about 2,000 men,were at Chambersburg last night,but have not been heard from this morning. The general commanding directs that you remain in your present position until further orders, keeping your scouts well out on all the roads, and holding your command ready to go to any point where you may think there is a probability of encountering the enemy. General Averell, who