War of the Rebellion: Serial 028 Page 0044 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXI.

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eral Ward and others were told by citizens that the enemy was making for a point below Poolesville, and such was the general impression.

I send a sketch* to illustrate the disposition of the force under my command, and which, under all the circumstances, I consider a judicious one, but which was rendered nugatory by the rapidity and uncertainty of the enemy's movements.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE STONEMAN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding, &c.

General S. WILLIAMS,

Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac.

HEADQUARTERS,

Poolesville, Md., October 25, 1862.

GENERAL: In reply to your communication of the 20th instant, I have the honor to inclose herewith the reports of the officers serving under my command on the 12th.

In regard to the first part of your letter, I beg leave to state that, instead of the enemy having passed within a short distance of me when I first received an intimation of their approach, they had not arrived within 6 miles of me, and that the point where they crossed the river is but a short distance from the direct route from Frederick to Poolesville. The instructions contained in the telegram of General Marcy, chief of staff, on the afternoon of the 11th instant, to mass the troops at any point where the rebels might attempt to cross the river, involved more than human efforts and foresight. It is true that the rebels took very nearly the direction indicated in General Marcy's dispatch; that is, they came from the direction of Frederick, but they did not attempt to cross the river within 6 or 7 miles of the point indicated (opposite Leesburg) in same dispatch. The statement of General Pleasonton, in his report, that-

had White's Ford been occupied by any force of ours previous to the time of the occupation by the enemy, the capture of Stuart's whole force would have been certain and inevitable-

is simply ridiculous, as the enemy could have crossed at almost any other point as well as there.

In conclusion, I beg leave to respectfully request that a court of inquiry be instituted, to inquire into al the circumstances connected with Stuart['s escape from Pennsylvania, and that the blame, there is, be affixed to the proper persons.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE STONEMAN,

Brigadier-General.

General S. WILLIAMS,

Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac.

Numbers 10. Report of Brigadier General J. H. Hobart Ward, U. S. Army, commanding Second Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND BRIGADE, STONEMAN'S DIVISION,

Camp near White's ford, Md., October 19, 1862.

MAJOR: I have the honor to state that on the 11th instant I was