War of the Rebellion: Serial 027 Page 0790 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXI.

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BALTIMORE, September 4, 1862.

Colonel MILES, Harper's Ferry:

You will re-enforce Colonel Banning, if it can be done without danger to your position and if it is true that the enemy is advancing on him. The force you may send will depend on the force of the enemy. You will send ammunition of various kinds for the two 12-pounder guns, if it is not too late.

They have but 30 rounds, at the present moment, for each piece.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE, September 4, 1862.

Colonel MILES, Harper's Ferry:

You will send the major, with the remaining two companies of the Eighty-seventh Ohio Regiment, to Berlin, to report to Colonel Banning at Point of Rocks to-morrow morning the 5th. The Twelfth Regiment New York Militia ought not to think of leaving for home until we know what the enemy at Winchester intends to do, and in what direction they intend to move. To go before, the regiment will forever be branded as cowards.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

HARPER'S FERRY, September 4, 1862.

Major-General WOOL:

General White abandoned Winchester night before last, and, with his troops, arrived at this post yesterday afternoon. No enemy that I can hear of in the valley of the Shenandoah, nor do I know if Winchester is occupied by him.

D. S. MILES,

Colonel Second Infantry.

BALTIMORE, September 4, 1862

Colonel MILES, Harper's Ferry:

* * * * * * *

General White will either repair to this place or join the Army of the Potomac, but his troops and supplies will remain at Harper's Ferry, and you will dispose of them.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE, September 4, 1862.

Colonel DIXON S. MILES,

Commanding, Harper's Ferry:

The order making disposition of Brigadier-General White is countermanded. He is ordered to repair to Martinsburg, and take command of all the troops in and about that place, guarding the railroad and defending that place to the last extremity. Answer immediately.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE, September 4, 1862.

Colonel MILES, Harper's Ferry:

You will, if possible, learn the whereabouts of the enemy, and the direction in which they are moving. It is possible they will attack your position, perhaps Martinsburg, or some position this side of

Harper's Ferry.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

HARPER'S FERRY, September 5, 1862 - 9 a. m.

Major-General WOOL:

Your last dispatch received this morning. The enemy (A. P. Hill's division, represented to be 30,000 strong) that have crossed the Potomac at Noland's Ferry have cut the canal at Seven-mile level, and running off the water. If Colonel Banning had more troops than are with him it would embarrass his retreat, which he must do before this force. He can retard and obstruct their advance, and such are his orders. I cannot safely detach from here until I know the intentions of the enemy at Charlestown. Three brigades is the force, I am told, in the valley, assigned to attack this place and Martinsburg.

D. S. MILES,

Colonel Second Infantry.

BALTIMORE, September 5, 1862.

Colonel MILES, Harper's Ferry:

If you can get cars, send the Twelfth Regiment New York State Militia home on Saturday, unless you should be attacked. Colonel Cram, whom I sent up to look after the positions as far as Point of Rocks, says all is quiet there. If there should be any indications of an attack on Point of Rocks, you will re-enforce them. Be energetic and active, and defend all places to the last extremity. there must be no abandoning of a post, and shoot the first man that thinks of it, whether officer or soldier.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE, September 5, 1862.

Colonel MILES, Harper's Ferry:

* * * * * * *

The position on the heights ought to enable you to punish the enemy passing up the road in the direction of Harper's Ferry. Have your wits about you, and do all you can to annoy the rebels should they advance on you. Activity, energy, and decision should be used. You will not abandon Harper's Ferry without defending it to the last extremity.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.