War of the Rebellion: Serial 027 Page 0786 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXI.

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Lee has changed his plans, I expect a severe general engagement to-morrow. I feel confident that there is now no rebel force immediately threatening Washington or Baltimore, but that I have the mass of their troops to contend with, and they out-number me, when united.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, called by the Government, and sworn and examined as follows:

By the JUDGE-ADVOCATE:

Question. Will you state to the court at what time General McClellan was ordered to advance and repel the enemy invading the State of Maryland; at what time he did actually advance; the average number of miles marched by him per day in pursuit of the invading enemy, and if. in your opinion, General McClellan should not have relieved and protected Harper's Ferry?

Answer. I could not answer that question without referring to the record. I could not trust my memory as to the date General McClellan left here or the dates at which he arrived at different points; I can do so by referring to the record.

Question. Will you do so, and transmit your answer in writing to this Commission?

Answer. I will; or I will appear here to-morrow and give it verbally.

The Commission then proceeded to deliberate with closed doors.

Subsequently the Commission adjourned to 11 a. m. to-morrow.

WASHINGTON, D. C., October 29, 1862.

The Commission met pursuant to adjournment.

* * * * * * *

The Commission resumed the investigation in relation to the evacuation of Maryland Heights and the surrender of Harper's Ferry.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, recalled by the Government, and examined as follows:

By the JUDGE-ADVOCATE:

Question. [Propounded yesterday in writing.] Will you state to the Commission at what time General McClellan was ordered to advance and repel the enemy invading the State of Maryland; at what time he did actually advance; the average number of miles marched by him per day in pursuit of the invading enemy, and if, in your opinion, General McClellan should not have relieved and protected Harper's Ferry?

Answer. [In writing.] I think General McClellan left Washington and established his headquarters at Rockville on the 7th of September. He left here some time in the afternoon or the night of the 7th; whether he got to Rockville before midnight or not, I cannot say. He had been directed some days before by the President to take the field against the enemy in Maryland. Most of his forces had preceded him, and on the 8th were encamped near Rockville, at Poolesville, Offutt's Cross-Roads, and on the road from Leesborough to Brookville. Burnside's forces moved along the latter toad on the morning of the 8th, and entered Frederick City, I think, on the afternoon or night of the 12th. General McClellan established his headquarters there on the morning of the 13th. The battle of South Mountain was fought on the 14th, and that of Antietam on the 17th. A part of the army crossed the Monocacy below Frederick City, and was reported on the 13th to be near Jefferson and Centreville, about 12 miles from Harper's Ferry. The corps of Sumner and Franklin were within about 20 miles of Harper's Ferry on the 12th. The battle of South Mountain was fought on the 14th, about 10 or 12 miles distant, and that of Antietam on the 17th, about 12