War of the Rebellion: Serial 027 Page 0634 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXI.

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By General WHITE:

Question. Did you ever exhibit that paper to me until after the surrender?

Answer. I do not remember whether I ever exhibited it to you at all until here. I have just stated in evidence that I did not receive the paper until several days after the surrender.

By the JUDGE-ADVOCATE:

Question. Do you know at what hour of the day the prisoners passed out?

Answer. I do not.

By the COURT:

Question. The fact that those prisoners had been released was known to the troops at the time it occurred, was it not?

Answer. Not generally.

Question. There was some excitement over it, was there not?

Answer. Not that I am aware of. I believe the matter was not known to any one, except the pickets who took up the passes.

By the JUDGE-ADVOCATE:

Question. Do you know whether they passed out of our lines by day or night?

Answer. It was in the day-time that they passed out.

Question. They would certainly pass in view of a considerable number of our troops, would they not, taking the route indicated in that pass?

Answer. They must have been seen by our forces.

By the COURT:

Question. You say the evacuation of Maryland Heights created great excitement in your regiment?

Answer. It did.

Question. What was the impression as regards who gave the order for the evacuation?

Answer. I heard no opinion expressed as to that.

Question. You spoke of it in connection with the men being dissatisfied with Colonel Miles.

Answer. They were disappointed in not going to Maryland Heights, according to the announcement made to me in the morning, and when, but an hour or so afterward, I heard that Maryland Heights had been evacuated, I supposed there was some connection with it.

Question. When Colonel Miles informed you that your obedience to the order to go to Maryland Heights was not necessary, what did you infer from it-that the order had been given to have the heights abandoned?

Answer. Quite the opposite.

Question. What reason was given that it was not necessary for you to go?

Answer. He assigned no reason; simply said we would not be wanted there; that it was not necessary I should go.

Question. That was an hour before the evacuation?

Answer. It might be an hour and a half or even two hours. My impression is that the evacuation took place about 3 o'clock; that is, the cannon ceased firing at that time.