War of the Rebellion: Serial 027 Page 0520 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXI.

Search Civil War Official Records

The following telegrams, which I sent to General White and Colonel Miles, will show that they were instructed what to do, and that, at all hazards, they were to defend themselves to the last extremity:

[Dated Baltimore, September 6, 1862]

Brigadier General JULIUS WHITE, Martinsburg:

Defend yourself to the last extremity. No running before the enemy is coming Reconnoiter.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

[Dated Baltimore, September 8, 1862]

Brigadier General JULIUS WHITE, Martinsburg:

The enemy is ported as approaching Hagerstown with a force of 5,000 from frederick. Notify Lieutenant-Colonel Downey, at Kearneysville. You will order that regiment to Martinsburg or harper's Ferry, if deemed necessary.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

[Dated Baltimore, September 8, 1862, in reply to his inquiry.]

Brigadier General JULIUS WHITE, Martinsburg:

If 20,000 men should attack you, you will, of course, fall back. Harper's Ferry would be the best position I could Recommend, but be sure that you have such a force against you, or any other that would overwhelm you. All surplus property will be ready for instant removal should you find it absolutely necessary to abandon Martinsburg. No property will be destroyed if by any means it can be saved.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

[Dated Baltimore, September 4, 1862-11.10 p. m.]

Colonel DIXON S. MILES, Harper's Ferry:

You will send the major, with the remaining two companies of the Eighty-seventh Ohio Regiment, to Berlin, to report to Colonel Banning at Point of Focks, to-morrow morning, the 5th. The Twelfth Regiment New York Militia ought not to think of laving for home until we know what the enemy at Winchester intends to do, and in what direction he intends to move. To go before, the regiment will forever be branded as cowards.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

[Dated Baltimore, September 5, 1862.]

Colonel MILES, Harper's Ferry:

* * * * *

The position on the heights ought to enable you to punish the enemy passing up the orad in the direction of harper's Ferry. Have your wits about you, and do all you can to annoy the rebels should they advance on you. Activity, energy, and decision must be used. You will not abandon Harper's Ferry without defending it to the last extremity.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

I did not fail to caution him in regard to supplies of ammunition and rations. His reply was that he had abundance.

To mine of the 5th instant, when I directed him to defend his position to the last extremity, he says, on the 7th instant:

The enemy is steadily pressing on my pickets, and is establishing batteries on the plateau opposite Point of Rocks, but I am ready for them.

This was the last dispatch I received from Colonel Miles. The telegraph wires were cut, and the road from Monocacy to harper's Ferry was in the hands of the rebels. Every preparation was made for the defense, both in guns and materials.

On Maryland Heights [there were] seven guns, and on Camp Hill fourteen guns and howitzers, besides three light batteries, with horses. It was reported to me that fifty-eight guns were surrendered. How