War of the Rebellion: Serial 027 Page 0481 Chapter XXXI. THE MARYLAND CAMPAIGN.

Search Civil War Official Records

the one hundred and ninth and One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers from the Second to the Third Brigade of this division, and by General Orders, Numbers 24, October 26, Headquarters Second Division, Colonel T. H. Ruger was assigned to the command of the First Brigade, General N. J. Jackson to the Second, and Colonel G. L. Andrews to the Third Brigade. By Special Orders, Numbers 7, Paragraph IV, Headquarters Twelfth Army Corps, October 27, 1862, the One hundred and second New York Volunteers was transferred from the Second to the Third Brigade, in obedience to Special Orders, Numbers 9, Paragraph I, Headquarters, Twelfth Army Corps, October 31, 1862. By Special Orders, Numbers 9, Paragraph IV, Headquarters Twelfth Army Corps, October 31, 1862, the One hundred and fortieth New York Volunteers was transferred to Porter's corps. In pursuance of General Orders, Numbers 6, Headquarters Twelfth Army Corps, October 28, 1862, three batteries were assigned to this division.

A reconnaissance in loudoun Valley was made by a detachment of the First and Second Brigades, with 300 of the Sixth New York Cavalry division, October 21. A number of prisoners were captured and an official report made to Major-General burnside, commanding defenses of Harper's Ferry.

Pursuant to orders from corps headquarters, October 26, the division left Loudoun Heights, and encamped in the valley on the east side of the Heights.

In obedience to orders from corps headquarters, October 29, 1862

the command was moved to Bolivar Heights, on October 30, reliving General Summer's corps, and picketing from the Shenandoah to the Potomac River.

November 9, a reconnaissance in force was made by the division, under brigadier-general commanding, to Rippon, within 6 miles of Berryville, driving the enemy before them, capturing prisoners, arms, horses, and cattle, and ascertaining the location and strength of the enemy in the valley between this point and Front Royal.

A second reconnaissance, with 600 infantry and two pieces of artillery, under the general commanding the division, was made on the 26th as far as Charlestown, having a skirmish with the enemy's cavalry at Cockrall's Mill, on the Shenandoah, routing them, wounding several, and taking a number of prisoners, arms, and horses, together with a quantity of flour, and destroying at that place a cloth-mill in the employ of the rebels. Thence the command marched to a point opposite Shennondale Spring, and thence to Charlestown, between which and Halltown a rebel camp was broken up, and the Seventh and Twelfth Virginia Cavalry put to flight. No enemy was discovered, other than cavalry parties, in the front. Returned on the immediate front. Returned on the same day without any casualties.

The command has been actively employed in picketing 3 miles of front, from the Potomac to the Shenandoah, occasionally harassed by small parties of rebel cavalry, without any serious casualties. A large portion of the division has also been arduously engaged in fatigue duties, felling timber, and constructing and improving the fortifications of the position.

31 R R-VOL XIX, PT I