War of the Rebellion: Serial 027 Page 0137 Chapter XXXI. GENERAL REPORTS.

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28th.

To General McCLELLAN:

Saw to night, 3 miles northwest of Falling Waters, two squadrons of enemy's cavalry marching north. No signs troops from this points except pickets half mile (of) river.

DENICKE.

29th.

To General McCLELLAN:

Heavy dust seen south-southwest, about 10 miles from Shepherdstown. Cannot make out anything in it.

JEROME.

(Received.)

To Major MYER:

Great smoke at the foot of the mountain, southwest of your headquarters. Extends along several miles.

JEROME.

(Sent.)

Lieutenant Jerome will report the distance and the bearing of the smoke from Shepherdstown.

Major MYER.

(Received.)

To Major MYER:

It must be about 8 or 0 miles south-southwest from Shepherdstown.

JEROME.

(Received.)

Cannonading heard 3 northwest of Shepherdstown and about 5 miles from that place.

JEROME.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. A. TAYLOR,

First Lieutenant Forty-ninth New York Vols., Actg. Signal Officer.

Captain B. F. FISHER,

Commanding Signal Detachment.

Numbers 9. Report of Lieutenant J. Gloskoski, Twenty-ninth New York Infantry, Acting Signal Officer, U. S. Army, of operations September 16-November 29.

CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, November 29, 1862.

SIR: Agreeable to your circular, requesting us to make report of the service performed by us, "the difficulties we have met," and "off all that may be necessary for the Chief Signal Officer to know," I have the honor to submit the following:

On the 16th of September I accompanied the Chief Signal Officer to the summit of Elk Mountain, Maryland, for the purpose to establish signal station there and observe the enemy's movements. The point chosen for observations was an excellent one, and messages sent from it very important. From there we had full view of the enemy's lines. We have reported immediately the positions and each change of position of all their batteries and their forces. From that point I have communicated to five different stations, viz, one at General McClellan's headquarters, one at General Burnside's (left wing), one at General Hooker's, and two in the center of our lines. Same day we reported to General McClellan:

An immense train of the enemy's wagons is moving on the road from Sharpsburg to Shepherdstown. They cross the Potomac and halt about a mile south of Shepherdstown.