War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 1092 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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PETERSBURG, VA., June 3, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War, C. S. A.:

I hope that I will not be regarded as intrusive for again urging that Ransom be sent to North Carolina.

The political reasons are still stronger that the military. I am satisfied that if the Yankees get on the railroad there will be an amount of toryism developed not now dreamed of. Mr. Warren, of Beaufort, one of the Governor's council, said in a speech in the Legislature that if the enemy go possession of the railroad it would be time for North Carolina to decide to whom her allegiance was due, the United States or Confederate States Government. Holden and his followers are ready to go to Goldsborough to meet the Yankees and welcome them to the State.

The Forty-second and Seventeenth North Carolina regiments are large and strong, and I would be willing to give up either of them to secure Ransom, and I presume either has as many men as his brigade.

Very respectfully,

D. H. HILL,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FORCES LOCAL DEFENSE,

Third Line of Defenses, Darbytown Road, June 3, 1863.

Major T. O. CHESTNEY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, &c., Richmond, Va.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that in obedience to instructions the forces for local defense are distributed on the Charles City, Darbytown, and New Market roads, viz, about 600 on the former, under Lieutenant-Colonel Brown; about 600 on the second, under Major Waller; about 350 on the third, under Lieutenant Minor (Navy). One thousand be posted on the Varina road.

Everything quiet here.

Very respectfully,

G. W. C. LEE,

Brigadier-General.

P. S.-I omitted to mention that there is one boat howitzer on the New Market road and none on the other two roads of which I have charge. If there is danger of attack on these roads artillery is necessary.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, June 3, 1863.

General R. E. LEE:

Information fully confirmed as to the evacuation of West Point and movement of column of 4,000 or 5,000 of the enemy, flanked by a circling cavalry detachment, probably as scouts, on the north and west side, to the Rappahannock, in Essex, near Tappahannock.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.